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50 Years Of Remembering Medgar Evers, His Widow Reflects

Fifty years ago, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was shot and killed outside his home in Mississippi. Host Michel Martin speaks with his widow, Myrlie Evers-Williams, about how she remembers him and keeps his legacy alive today.
NPR

With Space-Bound Hubbies, 'Astrowives' Became 'First Reality Stars'

On April 9,1959, the U.S. introduced its first astronauts, and then launched their wives into the spotlight. In The Astronaut Wives Club, Lily Koppel looks at how seven women coped with the attention and anxiety that came with being married to the space race.
NPR

Spit And Cotton Swabs The Tools For A Mummy Facelift

Audie Cornish speaks with Mimi Leveque, head conservator on a project that restored a 2,500-year-old mummy. The mummy got face work and cleaning done courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital.
NPR

The Latest In Adventurous Tastings? Prison Food

Prison food gets a bad rap, but a recent tasting at a historic penitentiary showed that prison menus of the past were less predictable and maybe even more nutritious than the institutional-style meals served in most prisons today. Some prisons are returning to scratch cooking, and are opening restaurants to train inmates in food service.
NPR

Za'atar: A Spice Mix With Biblical Roots And Brain Food Reputation

This alluring spice mix has an incredible aroma and deep roots in the Middle East. For centuries, people have been eating za'atar not just for its savory taste but also for its reputed health benefits. Modern research confirms it's packed with antioxidants.
NPR

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

On June 11, 1963, Gov. George Wallace stood at the University of Alabama to block two black students attempting to cross the color line and register for classes. That event forever associated him with segregation. His daughter is trying to shake that association, and is using her voice to promote healing.

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