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NPR

Which Artworks Should We Save? Cash-Strapped Italy Lets Citizens Vote

With money tight, Italian officials are faced with an unbearable choice: Which works of art should be saved, when the government can't afford to save them all? At the end of 2013, the government organized an online vote to give citizens a say in the matter.
NPR

A Promise Unfulfilled: 1962 MLK Speech Recording Is Discovered

Last fall, curators and interns at the New York State Museum were digging through their audio archives in an effort to digitize their collection. They unearthed a treasure: a reel-to-reel tape of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s speech commemorating the centennial of the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
NPR

Is The Black Church 'Divided?'

The fusion between faith and politics was always central to the fire of the civil rights movement. But the current leader of Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s original home - the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta - feels that some of that heat has died down. Host Michel Martin asks Reverend Raphael Warnock why he feels the black church is split. This segment originally aired Jan. 10, 2014 on Tell Me More.
NPR

Church Struggles With Protecting Emancipation Proclamation Draft

Important papers that document our nation's history, like the Constitution or the Bill of Rights, can be found at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. But another important historical document, handwritten and signed by President Abraham Lincoln, is on public display seven days a week at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in the nation's capital.
NPR

Not My Job: Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Gets Quizzed On The Future

Goodwin's an expert on presidents of the past, so we'll quiz her on presidents of the future — three questions about leaders from science fiction.
NPR

Did Author Amiri Baraka 'Remix' Who He Was?

Author Amiri Baraka sparked a lot of controversy with his writings — and those controversies were reignited with his recent passing. Host Michel Martin speaks with author and professor Mark Anthony Neal about Baraka's divisive career, and where he belongs in the larger context of American literature.
NPR

Japanese Soldier Who Fought On For 29 Years After WWII Dies

For nearly three decades, until 1974, Lt. Hiroo Onoda lived in a Philippine jungle. During those years he continued to battle with villagers. As many as 30 people were killed. It wasn't until his former commander ordered Onoda to lay down his arms that he surrendered. Onoda died Thursday. He was 91.
WAMU 88.5

After Nearly 80 Years, Maryland Polka Hall Prepares For Last Dance

Blob's Park, a beer garden and polka hall that's kept patrons dancing for nearly 80 years, is slated to close in March.

WAMU 88.5

D.C.'s Stonehenge: The History of the McMillan Sand Filtration Site

The McMillan sand filtration site is a prominent D.C. landmark, but relatively few people know the full history of the structure.

WAMU 88.5

Baltimore's 'Arabbers' Keep 150 Years Of Tradition Alive

Baltimore's "arabbers" walk around the city selling fruits and vegetables from horse-drawn carts — a job that harkens all the back to the Civil War.

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