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WAMU 88.5

Broadway-Bound Musical 'If/Then' Injects New Energy Into National Theatre

D.C.'s historic National Theatre is returning to its roots with the world premiere of "If/Then," a new musical that's heading to Broadway in spring 2014.

WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: Wild Cards

From the environment to school lunches to a local campaign designed to get us dancing in our underwear, we'll bring you an eclectic array of stories on this week's "Wild Cards" show.

NPR

Does The Word "Redskins" Cause Psychological Damage?

Members of the Oneida Nation met with representatives from the NFL on Wednesday to discuss the growing call to change the Washington Redskins name. Host Michel Martin finds out how the meeting went from the Nation's representative, Ray Halbritter.
NPR

The Secret, Steamy History Of Halloween Apples

A Halloween apple was once a powerful symbol of fertility and immortality. In Europe and the early years of America, girls used apples and apple peels to divine their romantic destiny.
NPR

75 Years Ago, 'War Of The Worlds' Started A Panic. Or Did It?

On the evening of Oct. 30, 1938, Orson Welles and his troupe went on the air to say that Martians had invaded New Jersey. Ever since, stories have made it sound as if the broadcast caused a mass panic. But that might not have been the case.
WAMU 88.5

The Moral And Economic Costs Of Slavery

The film "Twelve Years a Slave" is a brutal reminder of the connection between America's early economic success and the North American slave trade. Facing up to the moral and economic cost of slavery.

NPR

Talk To The Head Honcho; He Speaks Japanese

While "honcho" is often mistakenly believed to have Spanish origins, it actually traces its roots to American soldiers who fought in the Pacific during World War II.
NPR

That's Not What She Said? 7 Quotes You May Be Getting Wrong

Did Winston Churchill say, "You can always count on the American people to do the right thing, after they have exhausted all other possibilities"? Take our quiz to find out.
NPR

Botched Investigation Fuels Kennedy Conspiracy Theories

It's been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, and polls show that a majority of Americans still believe Kennedy was the victim of a conspiracy, not a lone assassin. Philip Shenon, author of A Cruel and Shocking Act, explores what keeps these conspiracy theories alive.
NPR

International Bugging: Why The U.S. Snoops

News organizations in France, Germany and Spain have reported wide-spread monitoring by the National Security Agency in their countries. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with journalists from Der Spiegel and Le Figaro, about the recent revelations.

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