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"The Impulse Society"

Are Americans more driven toward short-term self-gratification than they were a few generations ago? Author Paul Roberts argues that during the past century, American values have shifted - to the point that our society now favors the...

NPR

Old Ship Logs Reveal Adventure, Tragedy And Hints About Climate

Volunteers are combing through old ships' logbooks for the Old Weather project. It aims to help scientists better understand the climate today by looking at conditions of the past.
NPR

40 Years After 'Working,' A View From The Driver's Seat

Four decades after Studs Terkel's famous collection of oral histories was published, Radio Diaries revives one of his interviews with Helen Moog, an Ohio taxi driver and grandmother of five.
NPR

151 Years Later, Pickett's Charge Hero Gets Medal Of Honor

Wisconsin native Lt. Alonzo Cushing's award caps a nearly three-decade campaign to get the Civil War battle honor through Congress.
NPR

How 'Sassy' Came To Mean Something Both Sweet And Sour

Since the new Lifetime show Girlfriend Intervention has resurrected the tired old cliche of the "sassy black woman," one black woman decided "sassy" needed some scrutiny.
NPR

London Evacuees Bore A Painful Cost Of War

NPR's Scott Simon talks with Pam Hobbs about the 75th anniversary of Operation Pied Piper. She was one of the children who were evacuated from London during World War II.
NPR

When A Mayor Moved To The Cabrini-Green Projects

Chicago's Circle Interchange highway loop was renamed after Jane Byrne this week, the city's first and only female mayor. Scott Simon talks with Kathy Byrne about her mother's legacy.
WAMU 88.5

Recording the Capital: A Musical History of D.C. (Rebroadcast)

The musical history of the Washington area goes deeper than Duke Ellington and Chuck Brown. But much of the music recorded here in the 20th century, from early rock and roll to bluegrass to jazz, was forgotten about long ago. Kojo chats with Jay Bruder, the host of "The Hometown Special" on WAMU's Bluegrass Country, about the recorded musical history of the nation's capital.

NPR

How A Colonial-Era Error Put The Carolinas At Odds

Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
NPR

Freedom Strategy Put To The Test At Democratic National Convention

Fifty years ago, Fannie Lou Hamer, a plantation worker turned civil rights activist, disrupted the Democratic National Convention to get delegates from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party seated.

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