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NPR

Bake Bread Like A Pioneer In Appalachia ... With No Yeast

Bacteria can make a bread rise and give it a cheesy flavor. That's the secret ingredient in salt rising bread, which dates to the late 1700s in Appalachia, when bakers didn't have yeast on hand.
NPR

Race To Unearth Civil War-Era Artifacts Before Developer Digs In

Archaeologists in South Carolina are excavating a Union officer prisoner-of-war camp site, hoping to find historical artifacts before they are buried under new construction.
NPR

The Wonders Of The Year 2014, As Told By Isaac Asimov

To mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 New York World's Fair, we turn back to some predictions that The New York Times commissioned Isaac Asimov to make on the occasion. He got many things right.
NPR

Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-D.M.C?

The Library of Congress recently added 25 new recordings to its National Recording Registry, but none of them were hip-hop or rap songs. Did it miss a beat?
NPR

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
NPR

Remembering Harriet Quimby, A Daring Female Pilot

Harriet Quimby was the first American woman to get a pilot's license. It was 1910; women could not even vote, but Quimby wanted to see the world.
NPR

15 Years After Columbine, Are Schools Any Safer?

The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.
NPR

To Fight Extremism, Don't Alienate Troublemakers At The Mosque

In the fight against Islamic extremism, the president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council says that intervention within the community is more effective than external surveillance and secrecy.
NPR

Do America's Deportation Policies Work?

Guest Host Celeste Headlee learns more about the United States' deportation policies from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute.
NPR

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

In 1954, the Supreme Court outlawed segregation. David Greene talks to ProPublica's Nikole Hannah-Jones about her story in The Atlantic. She examines the failure of school desegregation.

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