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NPR

No More Fakelore: Revealing The Real Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine

The Pennsylvania Dutch didn't invent the whoopie pie and other dubious tourist fare. Instead, they developed a complex, largely unknown cuisine that reflects the pressures and possibilities of becoming American.
WAMU 88.5

Twenty-Four Historic Sites Compete For $1 Million In Preservation Grants

A contest has 24 local historic sites fighting for votes—and $1 million in preservation grants.

NPR

World War II Code Is Broken, Decades After POW Used It

It's been 70 years since the letters of John Pryor were understood in their full meaning. That's because as a British prisoner of war in Nazi Germany, Pryor's letters home to his family also included intricate codes that were recently deciphered by codebreakers for the first time since the 1940s.
NPR

WWII Prisoner Of War Created A Code, Uncracked Until Now

Sixty years ago, John Pryor, a British prisoner of war in a German camp wrote about 80 letters home. Under his prosaic descriptions of camp life were coded messages asking for supplies and detailing German military secrets. Host Scott Simon talks with Stephen Pryor, his son, who worked with researchers at the University of Plymouth to finally crack his late father's code.
NPR

Birmingham Students Reenact Historic March, 50 Years Later

In Birmingham, Ala., on Thursday, children took to downtown streets in a reenactment of historic events there 50 years ago. It's part of a series of events this year marking Birmingham's crucial role in the civil rights movement.
WAMU 88.5

African American Service In The Civil War (Rebroadcast)

Civil War scholar Ron Coddington has compiled a collection of portraits of these men and used the images as a jumping off point for telling their stories. He joins Kojo to help us understand the Civil War as they experienced it.

WAMU 88.5

Chinatown Documentary Explores Past, Future Of Changing Neighborhood

We visit D.C.'s Chinatown with a Washington-based filmmaker and Chinese immigrant who has made a documentary film about the rapidly-changing neighborhood.

NPR

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

The winter of 1609-1610 has been called the "starving time" for the hundreds of men and women who settled the English colony of Jamestown, Va. They ate their horses, their pets — and, apparently, at least one person. Scientists say human bones recovered from the site provide the first hard evidence that the colonists may have resorted to cannibalism.

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