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NPR

The Cost Of Free Doughnuts: 70 Years Of Regret

When the Red Cross began charging soldiers for snacks during World War II, it learned a painful lesson in the economics of free stuff.
NPR

Black Officials More Likely Probed For Corruption?

In Rumor, Repression and Racial Politics, author George Derek Musgrove looks at the history of black elected officials being investigated for alleged wrongdoing. He examines the role of race in U.S. politics between 1965 and 1995. Musgrove shares his research with guest host Maria Hinojosa.
NPR

Episode 385: How Good Governments Go Bad

As citizens lose trust in their lawmakers, they jockey for special treatment — and often get it. That just compounds the problem, argues University of Chicago economist Luigi Zingales.
NPR

Moving Buildings To Save D.C.'s Historic Foundation

A few months ago, six old brick buildings in the nation's capital were picked up and moved. Literally. Five of them will return as parts of a sleek new office building, re-creating the old streetscape while also transforming it. The massive project raises a question: What's important to keep in a city, and what should just be replaced?
WAMU 88.5

Asteroid Named For Astronomer, Gay Rights Pioneer Frank Kameny

It's been decided that an asteroid will be named after Frank Kameny, a government astronomer who was fired for being gay and later turned into a prominent gay rights activist.

NPR

A City's History Writ Small, In One Cemetery

In St. Augustine, Fla., a historic cemetery is best known for a famous priest who's no longer buried there. The Tolomato Cemetery also reflects the city's long history, from Spanish rule to more recent times.
WAMU 88.5

The Threat To Timbuktu

Political upheaval in the West African nation of Mali is threatening the desert city of Timbuktu, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

WAMU 88.5

"Snow-Storm in August:" D.C.'s First Race Riot

In 1835, a drunken slave entered his mistress' bedroom with an axe, setting in motion events that would lead to Washington's first race riot. We learn about the fascinating, and nearly forgotten, characters involved in the incident and its aftermath.

NPR

'Electrified Sheep' And Other Odd Experiments

In his new book Electrified Sheep, Alex Boese explores a colorful side of science, filled with bizarre experiments and eccentric scientists, like the surgeon who decided to operate on himself, and Benjamin Franklin, who gave mouth-to-beak resuscitation to a bird.

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