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States Stake Claim On Sir Francis Drake's Landing

More than 400 years ago, Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is poised to officially recognize one state's claim.
NPR

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Archaeologists have found the remains of the Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare first staged some of his most famous plays. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Chris Thomas, who dug up the theater.
NPR

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

When Djuna Barnes was in her early 20s, she walked into the offices of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle and announced: "I can draw, I can write, you'd be foolish not to hire me." The paper did. Nearly 30 years after her death, a collection of her writings and illustrations is on display at the Brooklyln Museum.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Seeks Funding For Monument Honoring Women

A new monument at the Virginia State Capitol will pay tribute to women's contributions to the state.

NPR

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

Deep Throat whispered "follow the money" to reporter Bob Woodward during the investigation of Watergate, the third-rate burglary that brought down the Nixon administration. Or did he? An NPR librarian launched her own investigation.
WAMU 88.5

National Slavery Museum Faces Challenges

Several creditors are making demands on former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder's National Slavery Museum.

NPR

200 Years Later, An American Warship Resurfaces

June 18 will mark 200 years since the start of the War of 1812. One of the most epic battles of that war took place in the Chesapeake Bay, only a few miles away from the young American capitol. A small, scrappy U.S. flotilla took on the British, who at the time had the world's largest and powerful Navy. The flotilla's flagship, the U.S.S. Scorpion, met a watery grave — but on the occasion of the bicentennial of the war, it is slated for excavation. Marine archaeologist and historian Donald Shomette joins Melissa Block to talk about the Scorpion and the fates of those who manned it.
NPR

Neanderthals: The Oldest Cave Painters?

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a red disk painted in Spain's El Castillo cave is at least 40,800 years old--making it the oldest known European cave art. Archaeologist Alistair Pike discusses how his team dated the disk, and whether Neanderthals could have painted it.

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