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Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

No one wants to return to the system of American apartheid. Public education, with its glaring inequities, is a reminder of all the work left undone.
NPR

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

The Nigerian Nobel laureate says the abduction of more than 250 girls by extremist group Boko Haram is a defining moment for his country.
NPR

Does It Matter if Schools Are Racially Integrated?

Sixty years ago, the historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling was supposed to level the field for all students. But some educators say we haven't made a lot of progress.
WAMU 88.5

Armed for Nonviolence: Guns and the Civil Rights Movement

Journalist and former civil rights activist Charles E. Cobb Jr. joins Kojo to explore the role that armed self-defense played in the "nonviolent" civil rights movement.

NPR

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Betty Reid Soskin has seen World War II, the civil rights movement, and lived "lots and lots of lives." The 92-year-old shares what she's learned with guest host Celeste Headlee.
NPR

Christopher Columbus Ship The Santa Maria May Have Been Found

The ship sank in 1492 after hitting reefs off the Haitian coast. Undersea explorer Barry Clifford says he's working with Haiti's government to carry out an archaeological excavation of the wreck.
NPR

Turnspit Dogs: The Rise And Fall Of The Vernepator Cur

The turnspit dog was once an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain. Bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit, the small but strong dogs ensured that the meat cooked evenly.
NPR

Congressman Clyburn Reflects On A Life Of 'Blessed Experiences'

South Carolina Representative James Clyburn's new memoir Blessed Experiences: Genuinely Southern, Proudly Black shares lessons learned on his way from the Jim Crow South to a top spot on Capitol Hill.
WAMU 88.5

Washington Monument Reopens Monday After Three Years

A 2011 earthquake forced the closure of the Washington Monument, but the city's iconic obelisk is being reopened to the general public on Monday.

NPR

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

America's first transcontinental railroad was completed with a golden spike 145 years ago. Thousands of Chinese workers helped build it, but their faces were left out of photos from that historic day.

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