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To The Mountaintop: Charlayne Hunter-Gault

For more than 40 years, she's been a reliable and engaging journalist on public radio and television. But did you know Charlayne Hunter-Gault was a civil rights pioneer while still a teenager...

NPR

The Artful Reinvention Of Klansman Asa Earl Carter

Since its first publication in 1976, The Education of Little Tree has sold more than 1 million copies. But the book and its author are not what they seem. That's because before Forrest Carter became a Cherokee novelist, he was Asa Earl Carter, a Ku Klux Klan organizer and segregationist.
NPR

The St. Cuthbert Gospel: Looking Pretty Good At 1,300

The St. Cuthbert Gospel was buried alongside its titular saint in the late seventh century, making it Europe's oldest intact book. After a massive fundraising campaign, the British Library acquired the handwritten, leather-bound tome, which is in surprisingly good condition.
NPR

A Century Of Joy And Heartbreak At Fenway Park

The nation's oldest ballpark is turning 100. Boston's Fenway Park has been home to the Red Sox through some of baseball's greatest highs and most heartbreaking lows. It may be an act of the baseball gods that the park narrowly escaped the fate of similar old stadiums that were torn down.
NPR

13th-Century Food Fights Helped Fuel The Magna Carta

A greedy king who seized food was a key driver of the Magna Carta. That 13th-century document was a key inspiration for the American Revolution 500 years later. But at the time, the barons who negotiated the deal weren't concerned with the rights of starving peasants — these 1 percenters wanted to protect their own power and property.
NPR

Mayor Bartlett Addresses Tulsa's Racial Divide

Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett has been attending the funerals of three African Americans killed in a shooting spree on Good Friday. The killings happened in the same city where the black community was assaulted by whites during the 1921 race riot. Bartlett tells Steve Inskeep his city has made a lot of progress since then.
NPR

How America 'Struck Back': Doolittle Raid Turns 70

Seventy years ago Wednesday, 80 Army Air Corps crewmen flew 16 B-25 bombers on a secret mission to Japan. The World War II attack became known as the Doolittle Raid, and this week, four of the five remaining Doolittle raiders will be gathering in Dayton, Ohio, to remember the mission.

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