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NPR

Stated: The Declaration Of Independence

For 24 years, Morning Edition has observed an Independence Day tradition: hosts, reporters, newscasters and commentators reading the Declaration of Independence aloud.
WAMU 88.5

"Barack Obama: The Story"

Kojo chats with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author David Maraniss about his new biography of President Barack Obama.

NPR

30 Years Later, Vincent Chin Seen As Turning Point

Vincent Chin was at his bachelor party in Detroit in 1982 when he got into a brawl with two white men. Witnesses say the men mistook him for being Japanese and used racial slurs. Chin was killed, but the two men never served time. Frank Wu speaks with host Michel Martin about how Chin's death became a catalyst for Asian-American activists.
NPR

Too Hot? No Cooler Time To Honor The Steve Jobs of A.C.

Triple-digit heat and summer storms that left millions without power help mark the upcoming anniversary of engineer Willis Carrier's 1902 breakthrough. So how did ordinary people endure the heat before A.C. became a necessity?
NPR

The Complex 'Tapestry' of Michelle Obama's Ancestry

New York Times' reporter Rachel Swarns traces the first lady's family tree in her new book, American Tapestry: The Story of the Black, White and Multiracial ancestors of Michelle Obama.
WAMU 88.5

Strolling Through History: Civil War Tourism Around DC

As the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, we explore well-known and well-hidden landmarks in the Washington region.

NPR

All Across America, Meat Billboards Ruled The Road

Although outdoor ads have been around since ancient Egypt, they really took off after the Interstate Highway System was born in the 1950s. And, what better way to entice the captive audience in the car than to advertise beef on a billboard?
NPR

Recent Rulings Show How Hard It Is to Predict High-Profile Court Decisions

Thursday's ruling on the controversial health care law showed that perhaps it's best not to pay too much attention to how smoothly oral arguments go, or to the legal prognosticators who try to predict the outcomes.

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