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NPR

Reading The Love Letters Of Lyndon B. Johnson

For Valentine's Day, the Lyndon B. Johnson library released letters from the courtship period between the late president and his wife, Lady Bird. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin presents some of the highlights.
NPR

'Armory Show' That Shocked America In 1913, Celebrates 100

The exhibition, which opened on Feb. 17, 1913, at the 69th Regiment Armory in New York City, became an important event in the history of American art. It introduced astonished New Yorkers to modern art, like Marcel Duchamp's cubist Nude Descending a Staircase.
NPR

The 'Baby Dolls' Of Mardi Gras: A Fun Tradition With A Serious Side

The baby dolls were born from racial segregation in New Orleans in 1912. A group of African-American prostitutes decided to express themselves through dance and costumes, challenging taboo by parading during Mardi Gras.
NPR

Is Honest Abe's Stovepipe Hat A Fake?

State officials in Illinois want to conduct DNA tests on the top hat on display at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum to see if he ever really wore it. Museum officials think the idea is worse than bad.
NPR

The State of Indian Country: Global Tribes?

Two days after President Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday, the president of the National Congress of American Indians held his own address about how tribes across the country are faring. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jacqueline Pata, the group's executive director, to learn more about this year's priorities for Indian Country.
WAMU 88.5

"The Beautiful Music All Around Us"

Musician Stephen Wade join us to explore the stories he unlocked when he set out to learn more about some of the most famous field recordings in American history.

WAMU 88.5

Digital Humanities

We’ll discover what digital humanities scholars are uncovering about the past and learn how some are thinking far in the future to preserve the culture of today.

NPR

Decades On, Stiff Drug Sentence Leaves A Life 'Dismantled'

George Prendes was 23 when he was sentenced under New York's Rockefeller drug laws — tough mandatory sentencing guidelines for nonviolent drug crimes. The 15 years Prendes served for a drug transaction still reverberate for him and his family.
WAMU 88.5

How A Maryland Community Draws From History As Slave Enclave

In honor of Black History Month, we visit two of Maryland's "kinship communities," which were settled by former slaves after the Civil War.

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