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NPR

'Black Eden,' The Town That Segregation Built

A small, out-of-the-way Michigan town is celebrating its unique place in America's civil rights history. From 1912 until the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, Idlewild was the summer refuge of choice for thousands of black Americans looking to escape the shadow of Jim Crow in the woods of northern Michigan.
NPR

Meet Al Black: Florida's Prison Painter

When the officials at a Florida prison realized who Al Black was, they gave him a paintbrush and the walls as a canvas.
NPR

Founding Fathers Defined Freedom Differently

Robert Siegel explores the possible consequences of the current of fear among some Americans that our freedom is eroding, and that a mark of that is the Affordable Care Act. How did the Founding Fathers create an umbrella idea of "freedom?"
NPR

The Highwaymen: Segregation And Speed-Painting In The Sunshine State

Today, their paintings hang in the White House. But in the 1960s, they sold them, often still wet, from the trunks of their cars.
NPR

Art, Race And Murder: Meet Florida's 'Highwaymen'

They are credited with churning out some 200,000 landscape paintings in the area of Fort Pierce, Fla., since the 1960s. And a teenager named Alfred Hair was the mastermind behind the whole operation.
NPR

Stated: The Declaration Of Independence

For 24 years, Morning Edition has observed an Independence Day tradition: hosts, reporters, newscasters and commentators reading the Declaration of Independence aloud.
WAMU 88.5

"Barack Obama: The Story"

Kojo chats with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author David Maraniss about his new biography of President Barack Obama.

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