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Remembering Sally Ride

Astronaut and scientist Sally Ride passed away on Monday. We take a look back at her career and consider her legacy.

NPR

600-Year-Old Bras Were Austrian Fashion Statement

A missing link in the history of women's underwear has been revealed by the University of Innsbruck in the U.K. They are four linen bras dating back to the Middle Ages and change the answer to that nagging question, "Which came first, the corset or the bra?" Hilary Davidson, fashion curator for the London Museum, explains the importance of the find.
NPR

Columnist William Raspberry Never Lost Humor, Hope

The Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist was among the earliest black journalists to gain a wide following in mainstream media. His insights into education, poverty, race and crime were published in The Washington Post and appeared in more than 200 other newspapers. Host Michel Martin recalls the life and work of Raspberry, who died Tuesday at age 76.
NPR

Looking For Lady Day's Resting Place? Detour Ahead

When Billie Holiday died on July 17, 1959, thousands of mourners attended her funeral at St. Paul the Apostle Roman Catholic Church in New York City. But Holiday isn't buried in New York's Woodlawn Cemetery, near Duke Ellington and Miles Davis. Instead, she's "way, way, way out" in the Bronx.
NPR

Coney: The Hot Dog That Fed Detroit's American Dream

Take a hot dog from New York's Coney Island, throw in plenty of Greek immigrants and a booming auto industry, add some chili sauce, a steamed bun, chopped onions, mustard and an epic sibling rivalry and you've got the makings of a classic American melting pot story.
NPR

Who Killed Jean McConville? A Battle For IRA Secrets

A legal showdown is building that affects an American university, the British government, a brutal Irish paramilitary organization and the murdered mother of 10 children.
NPR

Let Them Eat Kale: Vegetarians And The French Revolution

The French Revolution conjures up memories of Marie Antoinette and the guillotine and angry peasant uprisings, but middle-class vegetarians may have also played an important role in the politics of the day.
NPR

50 Years Ago, Communications Became Global

On July 12, 1962, AT&T's satellite Telstar 1 became the first commercial spacecraft to beam television images from the United States to Europe. But the satellite soon began to malfunction. Cold War radioactivity scrambled its instruments. Host Scott Simon talks to engineer Walter Brown, who helped build the satellite.

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