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The Shifting Legacy Of The Man Who Shot Franz Ferdinand

Gavrilo Princip helped spark World War I when he assassinated the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne a hundred years ago. In death, he's been a more potent symbol than he ever was in life.
WAMU 88.5

D.C. Tour Guide Licensing Changes

A recent U.S. Court of Appeals ruling may do away with the 108-year-old requirement that "sightseeing tour guide"s in the District be licensed. Some professional and part-time guides are sorry to see the requirement go, while others say good riddance - we hear from both sides.

NPR

A Century Ago In Sarajevo: A Plot, A Farce And A Fateful Shot

On June 28, 1914, the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand sparked World War I. NPR's Ari Shapiro takes a tour of the city and learns the improbable story behind that shot heard round the world.
NPR

'Don't Sneak': Dad's Unexpected Advice To His Gay Son In The '50s

Patrick Haggerty didn't know he was gay, but suspects that his father did when he told him not to hide his identity. Haggerty was 15, and his dad told him to be proud of himself.
WAMU 88.5

From West Africa to Baltimore: New Exhibit Explores The History Of The Banjo

From the 1730s through the 1830s, you could find more banjos in Maryland's Chesapeake region than anywhere else in North America.

NPR

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

This story in the "Book Your Trip" series features NPR TV critic Eric Deggans on two books turned TV shows about civil rights: PBS's Freedom Summer and Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.
NPR

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella couldn't find a map showing the original names and locations of Native American tribes as they existed before contact with Europeans. That's why the Oklahoma man designed his own map.
NPR

Chicago Program Designed To Prevent White Flight Gets Renewed Attention

The origins of the tax districts stem from an effort decades ago to retain white residents who were concerned their property values would plummet if black families moved into their neighborhoods.
NPR

50 Years Ago, Students Fought For Black Rights During 'Freedom Summer'

A PBS documentary about the 1964 movement to get blacks to vote in Mississippi airs Tuesday. Freedom Summer director Stanley Nelson and organizer Charles Cobb discuss the dangers the students faced.
NPR

Using Google Earth To Document Slave History

Archaeologists in Asheville, N.C. are on a mission: To share the city's history of slavery by using Google Earth. Jeff Keith explains the project and what's come of their findings.

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