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NPR

A Barbados Family Tree With 'Sugar In The Blood'

In her new book, Andrea Stuart explores the intersection of sugar, slavery, settlement, migration and survival in the Americas. Stuart's personal history was shaped by these forces — she is descended from a slave owner who had relations with an unknown slave.
NPR

Remembering Rosa Parks On Her 100th Birthday

Civil rights activist Rosa Parks would have been 100 years old today. NPR's Celeste Headlee talks with listeners about the first time they learned about Parks and what she signifies today.
NPR

For Kidjo, Musicians Must Be The Country's Voice

The West African nation of Mali has a rich musical heritage, and Islamic extremists there have been trying to destroy it. Singer Angelique Kidjo says the conflict in Mali reminds her of a crackdown by a Communist regime in her native Benin — which led her into exile. But Kidjo tells host Michel Martin the power of music will always triumph.
WAMU 88.5

Readers' Review: "The March" By E.L. Doctorow

For February's Readers’ Review, E.L. Doctorow’s historic novel about Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman’s path of destruction through the deep South near the end of the Civil War. The title is “The March.”

WAMU 88.5

President Lincoln's Cottage Displays Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation will be on display at President Lincoln's Cottage for a little while longer.

NPR

The Retrial Of Socrates: Verdict Reached

On Thursday, the National Hellenic Museum in Chicago hosted a Re-trial of Socrates, hearkening back to the famous conviction in 399 B.C. that sentenced the philosopher to death by hemlock. Last week, Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon chatted with former U.S. attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who defended Athens. This week, Scott presents the final verdict.
WAMU 88.5

Jeanne Theoharis: "The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks"

In the first comprehensive biography of civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks, author Jeanne Theoharis debunks the myth of Parks as a quiet seamstress.

NPR

Grand Central, A Cathedral For Commuters, Celebrates 100

The largest railroad terminal in the world opened its doors for the first time in 1913. And while Grand Central Terminal, in the heart of New York City, no longer serves long-distance trains, it is still a vibrant part of the city's ecosystem.

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