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NPR

Mixed Pickle: The Sweet And Sour Legacy Of Dutch Trade

What do salt, ancient Jewish pickle carts, the sometimes brutal Indonesian spice trade and Vincent Van Gogh have in common? They brought life to Dutch cuisine, specifically, the Dutch pickle.
NPR

The Moment Race Mattered: A Haunting Childhood Memory

Bernard Holyfield was 5 years old when he learned that skin color made a big difference. He recalls an incident in the early 1960s in Alabama in which a drunken white man approached him and his brother while they were playing on their front lawn.
WAMU 88.5

David Von Drehle: "Rise to Greatness" (Rebroadcast)

The story of Abraham Lincoln's rise to greatness in 1862, America's most perilous year.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s iconic "I Have A Dream" speech has become shorthand for the civil rights movement, but we might never have heard it if not for a man who's largely been forgotten by history: Bayard Rustin.

WAMU 88.5

Adam Makos: "A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story Of Combat And Chivalry In The War-Torn Skies Of World War II" (Rebroadcast)

In his new book, “A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II”, author Adam Makos describes the fateful wartime encounter, and how the two men found each other nearly 50 years later.

WAMU 88.5

The Rev. Martin Luther King: His Legacy

The legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and race in America today.

WAMU 88.5

Food Technology And How It Shaped The Western Palate

Kojo and a food historian look back at how food processors have influenced both our palates and our preference for what we eat, and find out how the industry is changing to meet modern taste and dietary demands.

NPR

American Revolution Reinvents Guerrilla Warfare

In the new book Invisible Armies, author Max Boot traces the role of guerrilla warfare through history, starting in the Roman Empire all the way up to Afghanistan. He tells Steve Inskeep the American Revolution was the turning point in guerrilla warfare.
NPR

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

On Jan. 14, 1963, Alabama Gov. George Wallace delivered an inauguration speech destined to go down in the history books. That now infamous line, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," embodied a moment in U.S. history that changed the political landscape forever.

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