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NPR

Antietam 'Death Studies' Changed How We Saw War

In mid-September 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac clashed on the banks of Antietam Creek, just outside Sharpsburg, Md., in a battle that became the nation's bloodiest day. Two photographers documented the carnage in an unprecedented series of "death studies."
NPR

Revisiting 'Life' Magazine's 'Take-Over Generation'

In 1962, Life magazine ran its version of a "who's who under 40" list — a special issue it called "The Take-Over Generation." Many of the 100 young professionals profiled went on to prominence in their fields. Three men reflect on how America has changed since they were featured in 1962.
WAMU 88.5

D.C.'s Frederick Douglass Statue Will Move To Capitol

Frederick Douglass will finally take his rightful place in the U.S. Capitol, alongside statues representing historic figures from the rest of the United States.

NPR

A Little Patience, A Lot Of Salt Are Keys To A Lost Pickle Recipe

Expert pickler Marisa McClellan recreates a listener's lost pickle recipe, and explains why her grandma's pickles are saltier than many modern-day versions. They're fermented, like a true kosher dill pickle.
WAMU 88.5

Archives To Display 'Fifth Page' Of Constitution For First Time

The oft-forgotten "fifth page" of the U.S. Constitution will be on display at the National Archives this weekend for the first time ever.

WAMU 88.5

Lost Orders That Stymied Confederate Invasion Of Maryland On Display

A century and a half ago, a single misplaced document detailing Confederate battle plans helped the Union army repel a Southern incursion into Maryland.

NPR

Politics, The Pledge And A Peculiar History

Every so often, the Pledge of Allegiance gets wrapped up in a political campaign, often with the conservative candidate or group suggesting the other side is anti-American or anti-God. And each time, the actual history of the pledge is either ignored entirely or glossed over.
NPR

What's The Best Way To Remember And Heal?

It's been 11 years since the September 11th terrorist attacks, and that date still resonates with millions of Americans. But host Michel Martin looks at whether annual commemorations of tragic events help or hurt. She speaks with psychiatrist Dr. Carl Bell and Civil War historian Kevin Levin, who lost a cousin in the 9/11 attacks.

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