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David Rohde: "Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence In A New Middle East" (Rebroadcast)

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Rohde on how Islam is being reimagined in countries across the Middle East and what the changes mean for U.S. influence in the region.

NPR

Mo Ibrahim: The 'Bill Gates Of Africa'

Mobile communications entrepreneur, billionaire, and philanthropist, Mohamed 'Mo' Ibrahim is optimistic about the continent's future. He's invested millions of dollars to support good governance there. Host Michel Martin sits down with Ibrahim to talk about Africa's economic and social development.
NPR

Presidential Libraries Inspire Design Of George W. Bush Center

On Thursday, the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum is dedicated on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. David Greene talks to former first lady Laura Bush about the library and life after the White House.
NPR

First Western War In Afghanistan Was An 'Imperial Disaster'

In 1839, Great Britain and Russia were playing the world map like a chessboard — and for no reason other than geography, Afghanistan got caught in the middle. In Return of a King, historian William Dalrymple tells the story of Britain's calamitous invasion.
NPR

Muslim Family Values

Many Muslim people were hoping the Boston bombers didn't share their religion. However, the surviving suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is indeed Muslim, according to family members. Host Michel Martin speaks to Muslims from different ethnic backgrounds about the conversations they're having at dinner tables and in their neighborhoods.
NPR

Muslims On Boston Bombings: We're All Disgusted

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation about how Muslims are responding to the Boston bombings and handling backlash from the events.
NPR

How Coffee Influenced The Course Of History

Once people figured out how to roast the seeds of the Coffea plant in the 1400s, coffee took over the world. In doing so, it fueled creativity, revolutions, new business ventures, literature, music — and slavery.

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