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California Takes Drivers' Orders For 'Vintage' Car Plates

Thousands of California drivers are ordering specialty vintage license tags for their cars, in a program that lets people choose new tags based on designs from the 1950s, '60s, and '70s. The throw-back plates will let drivers put iconic blue, black, or yellow tags on their vehicles.
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"Lee Daniels' The Butler"

Eugene Allen began working at the White House in 1952. Over the course of three decades, he would witness the upheavals of the civil rights movement from a unique perspective.

NPR

Dredging South Carolina's Rivers For Long-Forgotten Timber

Dense forests of old-growth pines and cypress once blanketed South Carolina. As farming spread, nearly all the state's virgin trees were logged, but some sank into rivers en route to the sawmills. Now, some entrepreneurs are raising the preserved trees from the muck — and selling them for big money.
NPR

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.
NPR

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

When civil rights worker Jack Hansan traveled to Washington to participate in the march, the fear of violence breaking out was very real. But the father of four knew he had to be there, not just to witness history, but also to play a part in changing it.
NPR

Charles Manson: Master Manipulator, Even As A Child

More than four decades after the cult leader planned nine vicious murders, he is still part of American culture. Jeff Guinn's new biography digs through details of Manson's troubled childhood, with access to family members and photos never reported on before.
NPR

Museum Tries To Save The Plant Where Rosie Riveted

The Yankee Air Museum must raise $3.5 million to buy a portion of the former Willow Run bomber plant in Michigan, where Rosie the Riveter worked during World War II. Otherwise, the factory is due for demolition.
NPR

Preserving African-American Cemeteries

Under a popular park in Washington, D.C., there is a 19th century burial ground that was once the largest African-American cemetery in the city. Advocates want to protect the park from further development and create space for a memorial. But how many other such burial grounds are in similar straits, and how have others solved the problem of co-existing with development and gentrification?
NPR

Pope Francis' Comments: 'A Bridge, Not A Barrier'?

Pope Francis made headlines with his recent comments about gay priests. But many Catholics thought what he said about politics, poverty and women during his Brazil trip were just as ground-breaking. Host Michel Martin gets perspective from Father Leo Patalinghug and Professor Anthea Butler.
NPR

Barbershop Guys Take A Swing At Sports Controversies

The NFL slapped Philadelphia Eagle Riley Cooper on the wrist for an offensive slur he made off the field. But will his fellow players let him off so easily? The Barbershop guys weigh in on that and other sporting news.

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