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NPR

Failed Keystone Veto Override Marks Another Win For Veto Pen

Since the beginning of the republic, regular presidential vetoes have been overridden only 7 percent of the time, and that percentage falls to 4 percent if you include the sneakier "pocket veto."
NPR

Marion, Ala., Remembers Death That Sparked 1965 Selma Marches

The Selma-to-Montgomery marches might not have happened if not for the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson a few weeks before in Marion, Ala. NPR returned to Marion as people remembered Jackson and how his death was a catalyst for many other civil rights events in 1965.
NPR

The Secret History Of Knock-Knock Jokes

The complicated story behind the simple, repetitive wordplay jest.
NPR

Before Rosa Parks, A Teenager Defied Segregation On An Alabama Bus

Claudette Colvin was a 15-year-old student from Montgomery, Ala., when she refused to yield her bus seat to a white passenger. But she has been largely forgotten in civil rights history.
NPR

Ben Franklin's Famous 'Liberty, Safety' Quote Lost Its Context In 21st Century

He once said: "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." That quote often comes up in the context of new technology.
NPR

The Man Behind The Speech: Judge Carlton Reeves Takes On Mississippi's Past

Judge Carlton Reeves went from cleaning a judge's office to confronting Mississippi's past from the bench.
NPR

50 Years Ago, Selma's Bloody Sunday Sparked Voting Rights Act

In 1965, peaceful marchers were attacked by Alabama state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Selma has become a rallying cry for equal rights around the world.
NPR

Remembering The Relics And Rich History Of Mosul, Before ISIS

When NPR's Alice Fordham visited Mosul in 2010, bird droppings and rain were the biggest threats to its archaeological sites. Now ISIS has destroyed artifacts that had endured for millennia.
NPR

Not So Fast, Jamestown: St. Augustine Was Here First

Jamestown, Va., claims to be "America's First Region," but St. Augustine, Fla., turns 450 this year, making it the U.S.'s oldest continuous European settlement, a title residents are quick to defend.
NPR

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

Initially dismissed as a hoax a century ago, scientists have found evidence in Florida of humans living 14,000 years ago. If the findings hold up, they will help rewrite the history of early man.

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