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Dolphin Helps Navy Recover Rare Torpedo Under The Sea

A dolphin being trained by the Navy to find underwater mines recently made a surprising discovery: a 130-year-old brass torpedo, lying dormant at the bottom of the ocean. Host Rachel Martin talks with Chris Harris, chief of operations for the Navy's Marine Mammal Program, about the find.
NPR

Picnicking Through The Ages

Today, heading out to a picnic often means a simple blanket and a basket packed with the outing's repast. But back in the day, outdoor feasts were much grander affairs, with crystal, servants, tables and gourmet fare.
NPR

'Orphaned' By World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers

Now in their 70s, those who lost their dads in the war may not have clear memories of their own fathers. They've made do with voice recordings, letters and long-hidden photos, and found their own ways to honor their fathers' sacrifices.
NPR

'Four Little Girls' Awarded Congressional Gold Medal

They were just little girls when they were killed in what came to be known as the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing. And now Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley have been awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, nearly 50 years after the attack in Birmingham, Ala.
NPR

A Race Against Time To Find WWI's Last 'Doughboys'

In 2003, Richard Rubin set out to talk to every American veteran of World War I he could find. With help from the French, he tracked down dozens of centenarian vets and recorded their stories in a new book called The Last of the Doughboys.
WAMU 88.5

Archaeology in D.C.

The history of the District of Columbia pre-dates the formation of the city itself. The story of its early inhabitants can often be found in the soil beneath the modern metropolis.

NPR

How Genomics Solved The Mystery Of Ireland's Great Famine

Although scientists have known that a funguslike organism caused the potato blight that triggered the Great Famine in Ireland in the 1840s, they didn't know which strain was the culprit. But they do now, thanks to the genes in some 19th century potato samples.

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