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Grand Central, A Cathedral For Commuters, Celebrates 100

The largest railroad terminal in the world opened its doors for the first time in 1913. And while Grand Central Terminal, in the heart of New York City, no longer serves long-distance trains, it is still a vibrant part of the city's ecosystem.
NPR

Relentless, Despite Losses: Congressman's Climb To The Hill

Rep. James Clyburn talks to his granddaughter about his long road to becoming a U.S. congressman. After many losses, he never gave up, even when others suggested it was time to move on. Today, he's the highest-ranking African-American in Congress.
WAMU 88.5

Gold Medal Gymnast Gabby Douglas Donating Items To Smithsonian

Olympic gymnast and Virginia Beach, Va., native Gabrielle Douglas is donating many personal effects to the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

NPR

War And Foreign Policy Through The Eyes Of Vietnam Veterans

The Senate Foreign Relations Committee confirmed Sen. John Kerry as the next Secretary of State. Former Sen. Chuck Hagel is set to become the next Secretary of Defense. Critics and supporters of the men point to their service in Vietnam as critical qualifications.
NPR

From Aleppo, An Artifact Of A Calmer Age

The ongoing violence and tumult in Syria's largest city belie a richer, more prosperous past. One small object — a finely woven hat — offers evidence of life in a thriving cultural hub.
NPR

Dillingham Commission's Ranking Of Immigrant Groups Affected U.S. Policy For Decades

As momentum grows for immigration reform, Audie Cornish takes a look back in time at another moment when the country was grappling with its immigrant population. In the early 1900s, the Dillingham Commission was mandated by Congress to undertake a massive study of immigrants. We take a look at the 1911 report with Senate Associate Historian Betty Koed. Its conclusions led the country to prioritize certain immigrants over others. We explore how those findings still reverberate today with Richard Alba, a professor of sociology who has spent decades studying the immigrant experience.
NPR

The Love Song That Marked A Shift In French-German Relations

Last week marked the 50th anniversary of the Elysee Treaty, ending more than two centuries of hostility between Germany and France. The song "Goettingen," written by a young Jewish French singer at the time, represented a peaceful bridge between the countries. Host Rachel Martin talks to German political scientist Dieter Dettke, who studied in France in the early '60s and remembers hearing the song.

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