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NPR

Rat Pack's Sammy Davis Jr. Lives On Through Daughter's Stories

Many people considered Sammy Davis Junior the greatest entertainer of his era. His daughter Tracey Davis shares stories from her book Sammy Davis Jr.: A Personal Journey with My Father.
WAMU 88.5

First African-American Park Service Director Reflects On Places We Preserve

Robert G. Stanton served as the first African American to lead the National Park service, and says these parks say a lot about how Americans view themselves.

WAMU 88.5

House Moves Forward On Creation Of National Women's History Museum In D.C.

The prospect of a National Women's History Museum moved one step closer to reality on Wednesday.

NPR

Viewers Not Laughing About SNL Slavery Skit

A skit about slavery by Saturday Night Live's Leslie Jones outraged many of the show's black viewers. NPR television critic Eric Deggans talks about the joke and the backlash.
NPR

Richmond, Va., Wrangling Over Future Of Historic Slave Trade Site

More than 300,000 African and African-American slaves were sold in Shockoe Bottom. Today, residents and city officials are debating how to preserve the area: Memorial or stadium and museum?
NPR

How A Disgraced Reporter Tested The Public's Trust In Journalism

New York Times rising star Jayson Blair was busted in spring 2003 for plagiarizing and making up stories. Filmmaker Samantha Grant's new documentary, A Fragile Trust, sheds light on the scandal.
WAMU 88.5

Family Keeps Wooden Shipbuilding Alive On Eastern Shore

A pair of ship builders on Maryland's Eastern Shore are keeping alive methods of wooden ship construction that was passed down to them from their father.

NPR

Extra! Read All About It: 'Girl Stunt Reporter' Turns 150

Nellie Bly of the New York World was one of the most famous "girl stunt reporters" of her time. Now, the first ever edited collection of her work is being released, in honor of her 150th birthday.
NPR

Artists Bring Back The Human Zoo To Teach A Lesson In History

In 1914, 80 African men, women and children were brought to Oslo for the sole purpose of being gazed upon in a thatched hut village for five months by Norwegian natives.
WAMU 88.5

Sapling From Anne Frank Tree Planted On Capitol Grounds

A sapling honoring victims of the Holocaust has been planted at the U.S. Capitol.

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