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American Literature And The 'Mythos Of The Boozing Writer'

In her new book, The Trip To Echo Spring, Olivia Laing investigates the role of drinking in the lives of six great American writers: Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Cheever, John Berryman, Tennessee Williams and Raymond Carver.

Israel's Ariel Sharon: A Man Of War's Journey Toward Peace

Israel's former Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who suffered a devastating stroke in 2006 at the height of his political power, died Saturday after spending eight years in a coma. NPR's Scott Simon remembers Sharon with former ambassador Dennis Ross, who has played a leading role in shaping U.S. policy on Israel.

50 Years After Surgeon General's Warning, Smokers Still Light Up

In the 50 years since the Surgeon General's landmark report on smoking, what's worked to convince people not to smoke, and what hasn't? NPR's Scott Simon talks with Kenneth Warner, professor of public health at the University of Michigan, about cigarette consumption before and after the report.

The Church Bathroom That Stood As A Monument To A Segregated Past

When the bathroom building went up behind a small Louisiana church in 1959, the doors were painted different colors. Ushers would follow black parishioners outside to make sure they entered the correct door. The once-segregated bathroom recently became part of a discussion of racism, a from-the-pulpit apology, and a demolition.
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Sue Monk Kidd: "The Invention Of Wings"

Novelist Sue Monk Kidd weaves the true story of Sarah and Angelina Grimke into her latest work of fiction. We talk with Kidd about the novel, her inspiration and her work.


States May Recognize Same-Sex Marriages, But Navajo Nation Won't

Some Navajo activists want to overturn a tribal law banning same-sex marriages. They say the law contradicts Navajo values because it disrupts harmony. Host Michel Martin talks with people on both sides of the debate: Deswood Tome of the Navajo Nation Council and Alray Nelson of the Coalition for Navajo Equality.

Blending Red Wine With Porter Ale: A Crossover Beer Worth The Buzz?

Two of mankind's oldest beverages are being mashed together in a new generation of brews. These beer-wine blends, boasting layered, complex flavors, are part of a broader trend of experimentation, as craft brewers seek to distinguish themselves in a crowded field.

There She Blew! Volcanic Evidence Of The World's First Map

Some archaeologists have long suspected that a faded painting from the ruins of the 9,000-year-old village known as Catalhoyuk might be a map — of a settlement at the foot of an erupting volcano. Others said no. Now geologists have evidence that the volcano indeed erupted around that time.

Coal-Mining Area Grapples With How To Keep 'Bright Young Minds'

Residents of Martin County, Ky., where President Johnson traveled to promote his War on Poverty in 1964, say they need jobs more than government aid. Coal mines are shutting down, and many local college grads say they have to leave the county if they want to make a living.

Poverty And Not Knowing Your Neighbor Are Connected, Expert Says

It's been 50 years since President Lyndon B. Johnson declared war on poverty. Host Michel Martin speaks with Anne Mosle, of the Aspen Institute, about how much has changed since then and if the battle needs a new plan of attack.