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'12 Years' Star Alfre Woodard: 'You're Never Too Young For The Truth'

Actress Alfre Woodard missed out on an Emmy last night for her role in 'Steel Magnolias,' but she's got plenty of other golden statues to comfort her. She's also generating buzz for the upcoming film '12 Years a Slave.' Woodard takes us behind the scenes of that film, and offers some wisdom about the acting business.
NPR

Benjamin Franklin Never Said That

Professor Corey Robin got tired of looking up famous quotes to find they were spoken by someone else. Robin, of Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, named the phenomenon Wrongfully Attributed Statements — or WAS — and wrote about it for the Chronicle of Higher Education. He speaks with host Rachel Martin.
NPR

No Schmear Job: A Brief History Of Bagels And Lox

The origin of the bagel "is somewhat mysterious," says a writer who recently explored the topic. What is unquestionable is that bagel met and married lox in New York. But as in so many modern unions, both partners came to the marriage with plenty of baggage.
WAMU 88.5

Interactive Video Aims To Improve Hiring For Veterans

We visit the set of a a new interactive video aiming to smooth out the hiring process for veterans transitioning to civilian life.

WAMU 88.5

The Navy Yard: The History Of A D.C. Landmark Touched By Tragedy

The Navy Yard has been a part of Washington's landscape since the city's earliest days — and was critical in protecting the District during the War of 1812.
WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: The Navy Yard And Beyond

This week we reflect on Monday's shooting at D.C.'s Navy Yard, explore an interactive video aimed at helping veterans get jobs, and continue our series on the future of Smith Island.

NPR

War On Poverty Still Worth Fighting?

It has been almost 50 years since President Lyndon Johnson declared a "War on Poverty." But more than 15 percent of Americans still lived in poverty last year, according to a new report by the U.S. Census Bureau. Host Michel Martin discusses how the country is tackling poverty today with researcher Isabel Sawhill and economics professor Martha Bailey.
NPR

Bio Credits Manson's Terrible Rise To Right Place And Time

California parolee Charles Manson arrived in San Francisco in 1967, when the city was full of young waifs looking for a guru. In Manson, Jeff Guinn argues that if the cult leader had instead been paroled in a place like Nebraska, he likely would not have been so successful.
NPR

Latinos 'Not Just A Chapter In U.S. History'

The new PBS series Latino Americans takes a look at the 500 year history of Hispanics in North America, and how it's shaped their identities today. Host Michel Martin speaks with award-winning filmmaker Adriana Bosch about the series.
NPR

How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges

In Ebony & Ivy, an MIT historian details how the nation's colleges helped justify and benefited from the slave trade.

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