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Cat From Middle Ages Leaves Mark On History

A researcher of medieval history was studying a manuscript from 1445 in Croatia, and discovered paw prints. Apparently a scribe was working when the cat stepped in ink, and then stood with all four paws on the work in progress.
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Jada Pinkett Smith: Respect For Angela Davis' Turmoil ... And Hair

There's more to Angela Davis than her signature afro. A new documentary, Free Angela Davis and All Political Prisoners, explores the events that turned the philosophy professor into a political icon in the 1960s. Jada Pinkett Smith tells host Michel Martin why she became executive producer of the film.
WAMU 88.5

David Stockman: "The Great Deformation" (Rebroadcast)

President Ronald Reagan’s former budget director on today’s economy. David Stockman on what he calls the corruption of capitalism in America.

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What Do We Lose, And Gain, When Reducing A Life To A Recipe?

It's easy to see why a rocket scientist's obituary that led with a mention of her culinary prowess set off accusations of sexism. But food is undeniably a powerful marker of identity, as much or more of a statement of who we are as what we do for a living.
WAMU 88.5

Dan Jones: "The Plantagenets: The Warrior Kings and Queens Who Made England"

The Plantagenets were the dynasty that directly preceded the Tudors, ruling England for longer than any family before or since. Diane and bestselling author and historian, Dan Jones, discuss how their realm shaped England into the country we recognize today.

NPR

President Koroma: Sierra Leone's Beaches Make It A Place To Visit

A little over a decade ago, Sierra Leone was in the grip of a brutal civil war that tore the country apart. Today, the economy is on the mend and it's moving forward with reconciliation and reconstruction. Host Michel Martin speaks to Sierra Leone's president Ernest Bai Koroma to find out more about his challenges and successes.
NPR

Cable And Corruption In Southern California

The Galloway brothers, Clinton and Carl, spent most of the 1980s fighting to get poor minorities in Southern California access to cable television. It was a struggle that took them from City Hall to the Supreme Court. Clinton Galloway talks with host Celeste Headlee about his new memoir, Anatomy of a Hustle: Cable Comes to South Central L.A.
NPR

An Unlikely Explorer Stumbles Into Controversy

The mostly forgotten explorer Paul du Chaillu first introduced the world to gorillas. His methods were attacked and his work discredited during his lifetime, but he also experienced fame and redemption. Now, there's a new book that tells his story.

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