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This Week On Metro Connection: Learning

As local kids head back to school, we'll bring you a show about "learning" — both inside and outside the classroom.

NPR

Obama Encourages Next Generation To Carry On King's Vision

Freedom bells rang out in Washington and across the country on Wednesday, as Americans marked the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. President Obama, who's often noted his own debt to the civil rights leader, praised the tens of thousands of Americans who marched with Dr. King in 1963. He also challenged a new generation to continue to press for racial and economic justice.
NPR

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

Dumplings are a huge part of Chinese culinary tradition, and restaurants there cater to the nation's obsession with a dazzlingly array of dumpling shapes and fillings, including green frogs stuffed with bullfrog meat and a flock of birds filled with roasted Beijing duck.
NPR

Joining The '63 March, Despite Parents' Racial Biases

Maury Landsman's parents stayed home on Aug. 28, 1963. Their liquor store, like all others in the nation's capital, was shuttered the day of the March on Washington and the couple had no interest in attending. But Landsman, then 20, felt strongly that he needed to be there.
NPR

Taking A Closer Look At Milgram's Shocking Obedience Study

In the early 1960s, psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a controversial study in which participants were led to believe they were administering painful, high-voltage shocks to other subjects. Gina Perry, author of Behind the Shock Machine, says the study has "taken on a life of its own."
NPR

Speaking At The Lincoln Memorial, Obama Assesses 'The Dream'

President Obama delivered a nuanced analysis of the progress of Martin Luther King's dream on the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington.
NPR

Civil Rights Fight Of Today: Complacency?

Host Michel Martin talks with a group of young leaders about the future of civil rights. She asks about the social justice issues of today and the evolution of activism.
NPR

Rep. Lewis: 'I Gave A Little Blood Here And There'

Congressman John Lewis is a senior statesman now, but he was just 23 when he spoke at the March on Washington. He tells host Michel Martin what went through his mind during that historical moment, and what young people can learn about the movement today.
NPR

Freedom Singer: 'Without Music, There Would Be No Movement'

The Freedom Singers, Bob Dylan, and Joan Baez were some of the people who provided the soundtrack at the March on Washington. The Freedom Singers' Rutha Mae Harris tells host Michel Martin why the civil rights movement couldn't exist without music.
NPR

Behind March On Washington's 'Sunny Reputation,' A Deep Fear

Even though the March on Washington was nonviolent, many braced for riots. Host Michel Martin speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch about the story behind the march.

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