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JMU Professor Writes About Herbert Huncke's Life And The Beat Generation

Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs are all names you might recognize as poets of the Beat Generation. But a scholar in Virginia has published a book tracing the life of a friend and inspiration to all three of them.

NPR

Dig Finds Evidence Of Another Bethlehem

Archeologists are unearthing evidence that the city of Bethlehem, in the West Bank, celebrated as the birthplace of Jesus, may not have been the actual Bethlehem of his birth. They have discovered a Bethlehem that existed in the Galilee near Nazareth.
NPR

A Tribute To Marvin Gaye's Forgotten Classic

Motown legend Marvin Gaye composed the soundtrack for the film, Trouble Man. Critics say it's one of his finest works. To mark the film's 40th anniversary, Universal Music released a special edition album. In an encore presentation, guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with saxophonist Trevor Lawrence and director Cameron Crowe.
NPR

Just Who Was The Real St. Nicholas?

People around the world are celebrating Christmas - and perhaps enjoying a few gifts from Santa Claus. But many don't realize Saint Nicholas was a real guy. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Adam English, author of The Saint Who Would Be Santa Claus, about the real Saint Nicholas.
NPR

'Mad Science' Looks At Groundbreaking Inventors

You may not know that the traffic signal, the firehouse pole, and instant coffee were all invented by people of color. The stories behind those inventions and many more are included in the new book, Mad Science. Editor Randy Alfred speaks with guest host Celeste Headlee.
NPR

Students Crack Code Of Rhode Island Founder

Recently, a team of students at Brown University was able to crack the secret code scribbled in the margins of century old book. The coded message turned out to be the last known theological work of Roger Williams, an early proponent of religious freedom and founder of Providence Plantation, in what is now Rhode Island. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with Lucas Mason Brown, who helped break the code.
NPR

Survived The Mayan Apocalypse? Here Come The Radish People

Each Dec. 23, they descend upon Oaxaca's main plaza: giant root vegetables carved into human figures and other vivid forms. The Night of the Radishes is a major tourist draw these days, but it all started with Spanish missionaries in the 1500s. When a new religion and imported crops met indigenous woodcarvers, a novel art form was born.

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