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Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Displays At Library of Congress

The library will be displaying what's known as the John Hay copy of the famous Civil War speech.
WAMU 88.5

Glenn Frankel: "The Searchers"

A classic Western called "The Searchers" dramatized the true story of a young girl kidnapped by the Comanche Indians. How a film helped shape the myth of the American West.

WAMU 88.5

From Slave To White House Designer: The Amazing Tale Of Elizabeth Keckley

Elizabeth Keckley was born into slavery, but eventually became a seamstress and confidante to First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln, and a social activist in Washington, D.C.

WAMU 88.5

Designing A New Memorial To Godfather Of Go-Go

We meet the designers of a new performing arts venue dedicated to the godfather of go-go music: Chuck Brown.

NPR

'Unwilling Witness': Former Journalist Recalls Iraq War

Sometimes, reporting on a war can be as difficult as being in one. Host Michel Martin speaks with former journalist, Abdulrazzaq al-Saiedi, about the moment during the Iraq War when he decided to leave journalism.
NPR

As Gay Marriage Heads To Court, A Look Back At The Bumpy Ride

The Supreme Court hears two gay marriage cases next week. These will be the next major steps on a path the country has traveled for decades. Those who have been affected by the gay marriage battle reflect on the changes so far.
WAMU 88.5

David Stockman: "The Great Deformation"

President Ronald Reagan’s former budget director on today’s economy. David Stockman on what he calls the corruption of capitalism in America.

NPR

Perle Looks Back On The Start Of The Iraq War

As part of Morning Edition's coverage of the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, Renee Montagne talks to Richard Perle, former chairman of the Defense Department's Defense Policy Board. Perle was one of the most outspoken champions of invading Iraq, He explains his early support for the war and elaborates on the miscalculations of the last decade.
NPR

After 50 Years, A State Of Crisis For The Right To Counsel

On Mar. 18, 1963, the U.S. Supreme Court rules that state courts are required to provide counsel in criminal cases to those unable to afford it. Just before the 50th anniversary of the decision, Attorney General Eric Holder said that the nation's public defense systems "exist in a state of crisis."

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