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WAMU 88.5

Photographer Documents D.C.'s Haunting Memorials To Street Violence

Photographer Lloyd Wolf travels to murder sites across the District to document street memorials set up to honor murder victims.

WAMU 88.5

‘Ghosts of Georgetown’ Chases Three Centuries Of Ghosts

We'll take a spirit-rich stroll through Georgetown with the author of a new book about the neighborhood's alleged apparitions.

WAMU 88.5

This Week On Metro Connection: Haunted D.C.

We'll gear up for some ghost hunting as we bring you our annual celebration of the region's creepiest and spookiest.

NPR

Ex-Navy Carrier USS Forrestal Sold For 1 Cent

The vessel is famous for a 1967 incident in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War, when a stray missile triggered a massive fire that killed more than 130 sailors.
NPR

Put Some Sizzle In Your Halloween Costume ... With Sausage?

Costumes made of real food have long provoked reactions of both delight and horror. Many have sparked discussions about race, hunger, vegetarianism, commercialism, sexuality, morality and the ever-popular female body image. Here are a few of the more memorable examples.
WAMU 88.5

Doris Kearns Goodwin: "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, And The Golden Age Of Journalism"

The nation's 26th president was both a leader of the Republican Party and a Progressive. How Theodore Roosevelt used his "bully pulpit" -- a term he coined -- to push through laws to break up monopolies, protect consumers and create national parks.

WAMU 88.5

'War Of The Worlds,' 75 Years Later

It was 75 years ago that Orson Welles produced one of the most famous broadcasts in radio history: "War of the Worlds." But much of the mythology now associated with the original broadcast -- stories of miscarriages and suicides -- may be as fictional as the play's alien invasion storyline. Radio historian Neil Verma joins Kojo to explore what really happened, as well as the craft behind the radio play itself

NPR

Belafonte And MLK Family Take Memorabilia Dispute To Court

Musician and social activist Harry Belafonte is suing the family of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., over documents he claims were given to him by the civil rights leader. Host Michel Martin talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning MLK biographer David Garrow about the case.
NPR

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On Untangling African-American History

The history of African-Americans is a long and complicated one. Scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. is trying to tell that story in a new PBS documentary, The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. He speaks to host Michel Martin about tracing the African-American experience from the second inauguration of President Obama to the first African explorer.
NPR

The Racial History Of The 'Grandfather Clause'

Companies and individuals are considered grandfathered and exempt from new sets of regulations all the time. But the term and the concept date from the era of segregation that followed the Civil War.

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