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The Secret Operation To Bring Nazi Scientists To America

In the final months of World War II, the United States undertook an enormous effort to attract Nazi scientists to the U.S. Writer Annie Jacobsen's new book, Operation Paperclip, tells the story of that program.
NPR

For The Love Of Oysters: How A Kiss From The Sea Evokes Passion

Scientists have made some attempts to link mollusks to increased libido. There's even evidence that consuming heavy doses of an amino acid found in oysters can increase sperm count – in rabbits. But do any of these findings actually prove that oysters can — ahem — amp up arousal? Not so much.
WAMU 88.5

Sylviane Diouf: "Slavery's Exiles"

They are known as "maroons:" escaped slaves who lived on the margins of settlements throughout the southern U.S. A new book explores how and where they lived, and what day-to-day survival meant for those who fled slavery.

NPR

Remembering The Radio Stations That Got Loud With 'Black And Proud'

Going Black: The Legacy of Philly Soul Radio highlights a time when black radio stations were the only ones playing music by African-Americans. Host Michel Martin talks about the audio documentary with legendary music producer Kenny Gamble, who narrated the project.
NPR

Archaeology Find: Camels In 'Bible' Are Literary Anachronisms

New research revealing when camels were domesticated by humans shows that many depictions of camels in scripture may be off by hundreds of years. Renee Montagne talks to Carol Meyers, a professor of religious studies at Duke University, about what such anachronisms tell us about the genesis of religious texts.
WAMU 88.5

From Go-Go's Heyday To Today: One Musician's Love Affair With D.C. Music

Donald Tillery played trumpet with Chuck Brown's band during the heyday of go-go, and he's still making music decades later.

NPR

Thank You, Shirley Temple, For The Original 'Mocktail'

Generations of children have been charmed by Shirley Temple onscreen, and in a glass. The drink that bears her name, it seems, has a shelf life as long as her movies.
NPR

George Washington Carver, The Black History Monthiest Of Them All

Ask folks about George Washington Carver, and they'll probably mutter something about peanuts. But Carver's real legacy is hard to grasp. Race contributed to his fame and hindered his scientific research.
NPR

Museum Employee Breaks Napoleon's Chair

An employee at a museum on the Mediterranean island of Corsica was tempted to sit in Napoleon's chair. Of course it collapsed. The museum covered up the incident until the chair was fixed.
NPR

The Beatles, As America First Loved Them

Later, they'd get weird, experimental, and rebellious, but when the Beatles made their U.S. television debut 50 years ago, they were still just a band — but a magically brilliant band.

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