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After Waterway Closure, Minneapolis Sees An End To River Shipping

For the first time ever, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has closed part of a navigable waterway to stem the migration of an invasive species.
NPR

Confederate Flag Controversy Raised Again After S.C. Church Shooting

The place that the confederate flag should occupy has long divided the country. Many want the flag to be removed. But some leading Republicans have defended the right of South Carolina to display it.
NPR

'Project Fatherhood': In A Struggling Neighborhood, Dads Are Helping Dads

A dedicated group of fathers in Los Angeles is working to help neighborhood dads do better by their children and their community.
NPR

A Few Facts About Greeting Cards — From All Of Us At NPR

Did you get that perfect card for dad for Father's Day? Well, here are some things you might not know about greeting cards.

NPR

'Juneteenth' Marks Day Slaves In Texas Were Told They Were Free

After the Emancipation Proclamation, some slave owners kept the news from their slaves. In a 1941 recording, a former slave recalls June 19, 1865, when slaves in Texas were told they were free.
NPR

Independence Day For Americans With Disabilities

In July, the U.S. marks the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the powerful poster campaign that helped the country come to grips with disability rights.
NPR

Denmark Vesey And The History Of Charleston's Emanuel AME Church

Renee Montagne talks to historian Douglas Egerton about Denmark Vesey, a former slave and one of the founders of Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., where 9 people were shot to death Wednesday.
NPR

Woman To Share $10 Bill With Alexander Hamilton In 2020

The U.S. Treasury says a woman will appear on the $10 bill starting in 2020. NPR's Melissa Block talks with Matt Wittmann of the American Numismatic Society about the history of U.S. printed currency.
NPR

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

The new evidence suggests the ancient skeleton is closely related to members of a Washington state tribe. The findings are likely to rekindle an old debate between scientists and Native Americans.
NPR

Appetite For War: What Napoleon And His Men Ate On The March

Napoleon is credited with the phrase "an army marches on its stomach," but he probably never said it. Now 200 years after his legendary defeat, it's worth recalling his disregard for feeding his army.

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