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When The KKK Was Mainstream

In 1920s America the insidious Invisible Empire was not only visible; it participated in otherwise polite society.
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A First For Joe: Biden Could Break Tie To Confirm Attorney General

Vice presidents have cast 244 tiebreakers in the Senate, but if Biden rescues Loretta Lynch's bid, it will be the first time it has been used for a Cabinet nomination.
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25 Years After Art Heist, Empty Frames Still Hang In Boston's Gardner Museum

On March 18, 1990, robbers stole $500 million in art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. Author Stephen Kurkjian explains why anyone would bother to steal work so priceless it couldn't be sold.
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Cervantes' Remains Have Been Found In Madrid, Scientists Say

Almost 400 years after his death, researchers have found bone fragments that seem to match what they know about the celebrated author's burial.
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Tea Tuesdays: South America Runs On Yerba Mate

Legend has it the moon gifted this drink to the Guaraní people of South America. It was banned by the colonial government. The Jesuits made it their most profitable crop. Oh, and the pope drinks it.
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Can New York Police Build Trust Among Public Housing Residents?

Many New York public housing residents once trusted the police who patrolled their communities. Since an officer killed an unarmed man in public housing, some are pressing to change police tactics.
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To Eat Authentically Irish This St. Patrick's Day, Go For The Butter

From 3,000-year-old peat bogs to 19th-century Brazil to modern foodies, the love of Irish butter has spread far. The secret to Ireland's deliciously rich, creamy butter is in its rolling green hills.
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7 Creative Wedding Ideas From History

Couples nowadays are tying the knot in original ways — like some pioneering newlyweds in America's past.
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In Detroit's Rivera And Kahlo Exhibit, A Portrait Of A Resilient City

This is the first exhibit to focus on the time Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo spent in Detroit. It's a big step for the Detroit Institute of Arts as it recovers from the tumult of the city's bankruptcy.
NPR

Gather Ye Rosebuds: 'Citizen Kane' Screened At Hearst Castle

Citizen Kane by Orson Welles was inspired by media mogul William Randolph Hearst, who hated it with a passion. But this weekend, the film was finally shown at Hearst's legendary California castle.

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