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NPR

75 Years Ago, Kristallnacht Presaged The Holocaust

It was once impossible to imagine Germany without Jews. You only have to look at the Yiddish language to have a sense how richly the Jewish experience was integrated in the cultural life of Germany. That ended in the most vicious and heinous manner, 75 years ago Saturday, in what became known as Kristallnacht — "The Night of Broken Glass." The broken glass was from Jewish homes and buildings, and came to symbolize shattered Jewish lives. Some also consider it the start of the Holocaust. Back in 1988, NPR reporter Ketzel Levine pulled together some of the sounds of that period. This is an excerpt from that story.
NPR

Bearing Witness To Nazis' Life-Shattering Kristallnacht

On Nov. 9, 1938, the Nazis burned down synagogues, destroyed Jewish businesses and arrested more than 26,000 Jews. Germans and Jews alike are still grappling with the legacy, 75 years later. Margot Friedlander is one survivor, who has returned to Berlin after decades of exile.
NPR

Asian-American Lawyers Act Like '22 Lewd Chinese Women'

A cast of lawyers and a federal judge in New York City perform dramatic re-enactments of historic trials involving Asian-Americans. Their latest production, 22 Lewd Chinese Women, focuses on a 19th-century Supreme Court case with parallels to present-day immigration debates.
WAMU 88.5

Ivan Klima: "My Crazy Century"

Ivan Klima occupies a vaunted spot on the roster of great modern Czech writers. We sit down with Klima to explore his life, his literature and the lessons he’s learned.

NPR

School Named For Former KKK Leader Reconsiders Its Legacy

Nathan Bedford Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Fla., was named decades ago for a Confederate hero — who was also the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. More than 160,000 people have signed a petition urging a name change, but the current name has also drawn passionate support.
WAMU 88.5

How The 1968 Riots Shaped Shaw

The 1968 riots that followed the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  left scars in the Shaw neighborhood that persist to this day.

NPR

How Kennedy's Assassination Changed The Secret Service

The Secret Service made some immediate changes after the president's death 50 years ago this month: Open limousines were out. And it began taking a more aggressive approach to its advance work. Over the years, the service has established counter-sniper units, assault teams and surveillance units.
NPR

Striking Harmonies With The Jubilee Singers' Past And Present

The Fisk Jubilee Singers are known for their near-perfect voices and performances of African-American spiritual songs. Now the choir's musical director is on the road, mentoring to young groups across the South. He's also hoping to preserve the songs too.
NPR

Who Owns The Archives Of A Vanishing Iraqi Jewish World?

In 2003, U.S. forces discovered a trove of Jewish documents in a flooded Baghdad basement. They tell the tale of a once-thriving Jewish community. The painstakingly restored documents will be exhibited in the U.S. before they are returned to Iraq. But some Jewish groups are trying to prevent that.
WAMU 88.5

WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi Remembers Shaw During The 80s And 90s

Back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Shaw was home to several open-air drug markets, and shootings were not uncommon. But it was still a neighborhood with longtime residents who refused to give up on their community — including WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi.

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