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A Bumpy Ride: Airplane Food Through The Decades

The food on U.S. planes has gone from bad to nonexistent in coach class. But airplane meals have had ups and downs before. Now, airports and food delivery services are aiming to close the gap.
WAMU 88.5

Is Gentrification In D.C. Going According To 'The Plan?'

It's been 35 years since a newspaper columnist put forth the theory that white people were conspiring to take power from black officials. Does the idea still hold today?

NPR

The Gefilte Fish Line: A Sweet And Salty History Of Jewish Identity

Gefilte fish can be a hard sell even in its standard savory form. But some European Jews like it sweet, a preference that, surprisingly, overlaps exactly with a geographic and linguistic divide.
WAMU 88.5

The Price Of Progress In Rwanda

Twenty years after Rwanda's horrific genocide, President Paul Kagame is widely praised for dramatically reducing poverty and increasing life expectancy in his tiny, land-locked African nation. But critics say the economic progress comes at...

NPR

A Forgotten Referendum On The Union Of Scots And English

In 2011, there was a vote on closing the version of Wikipedia written in the Scottish language variety, Scots. The episode reminds us how language intersects with politics and class.
NPR

Ebola Battlers Can Learn From Venice's Response To Black Death

The city fathers didn't understand the plague they faced in the Middle Ages. Yet they improvised brilliantly. A new paper explains how their mindset is a model for how to face an unknown threat.
NPR

Sierra Leone: Where Colin Powell Felt His Roots

The West African nation is in the news today because of the tragic Ebola outbreak. It once played a part in another tragedy: the U.S. slave trade.
NPR

Jacqueline Woodson On Being A 'Brown Girl' Who Dared To Dream

In her new memoir for young adults, Woodson uses free verse to tell the story of growing up in the 1960s and 1970s. Her work for young readers often touches on themes of race and identity.
NPR

Multispectral Imaging Could Reveal Secrets Of Martellus Map

A team of researchers are using multispectral imaging to uncover hidden text on a 1491 Martellus map, one of the most important maps in history. Lead researcher Chet Van Duzer thinks the discoveries will allow historians and scholars to see just how the map influenced cartography in its time.
NPR

13 Days Of High Emotion That Led To The Egypt-Israel Peace

Lawrence Wright's new book examines the 1978 peace deal President Carter brokered between Egypt and Israel. During the tense summit, Carter had "never been angrier," Wright says.

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