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How Far Is It To The 'Boondocks'? Try The Philippines

For more than half a century, Americans have used "the boondocks" or "the boonies" to refer to a place in the middle of nowhere. But few people know that the phrase is a relic of American military occupation in the Philippines that was brought into the mainstream by a fatal training accident.
WAMU 88.5

Edgar Allan Poe House Reopens In Baltimore

After a six-month renovation, the Edgar Allan Poe House has reopened for limited weekend hours.

NPR

150 Years After Battle Of Gettysburg, Shutdown Hindering History Tours

As the federal government shutdown continues, national parks across the country remain closed to visitors. That includes the famous Gettysburg battlefield in Pennsylvania. But this year is the 150th anniversary of the battle that many historians consider the turning point of the Civil War. And Gettysburg is fighting to keep some of the crowds coming, even without federal funds.
NPR

At 300, Encyclopedia Pioneer May Yet Get A Hero's Burial

French philosopher Denis Diderot was the driving force behind one of the first compendiums of human knowledge, but his contributions have been largely lost to history. Now, the anniversary of his birth has prompted calls to reinter his remains in Paris' Pantheon, alongside the likes of Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
NPR

Will Settlement Bring Black Farmers Dignity?

After years of discrimination from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, black farmers are now getting a $1.25 billion settlement. Founder and president of the National Black Farmers Association John Boyd tells host Michel Martin what this settlement means for farmers and their families.
NPR

These Folks Went Vegetarian Back When It Was Way Uncool

Today is World Vegetarian Day, but every day is reason to go meatless at Hiltl's, the world's oldest continually operating vegetarian restaurant. This pioneering place opened more than a century ago in meat-loving Zurich.
WAMU 88.5

Shahan Mufti: "The Faithful Scribe"

Journalist Shahan Mufti describes himself as "100 percent American and 100 percent Pakistani." We talk with Mufti about the importance of storytelling for people and nations alike, and Pakistan's role in world events.

NPR

Tracing The Story Of 'Lynch Mob'

Last week, the CEO of AIG invoked the phrase "lynch mob" to compare the vitriolic reaction his company received about its employees' 2009 bonuses. Lynching was so common that a writer even referred to it being as "American as apple pie."
NPR

The $142,000 Pickup: Truck With 1.3 Miles Tops Vintage Car Auction

Hundreds of cars that were stockpiled by a Chevrolet dealer in Nebraska are finally being sold — many for the first time. The Lambrecht Chevrolet collection stretches back to the 1950s and has drawn bids and interest from around the world.
WAMU 88.5

Nicholas Basbanes: "On Paper"

A new book on one of society's most ubiquitous products. Since its invention 2,000 years ago in China, paper has revolutionized human civilization. A look at paper's sweeping influence on society from Islamic scholarship to the Pentagon Papers.

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