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Doris Kearns Goodwin: "The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, And The Golden Age Of Journalism"

The nation's 26th president was both a leader of the Republican Party and a Progressive. How Theodore Roosevelt used his "bully pulpit" -- a term he coined -- to push through laws to break up monopolies, protect consumers and create national parks.

WAMU 88.5

'War Of The Worlds,' 75 Years Later

It was 75 years ago that Orson Welles produced one of the most famous broadcasts in radio history: "War of the Worlds." But much of the mythology now associated with the original broadcast -- stories of miscarriages and suicides -- may be as fictional as the play's alien invasion storyline. Radio historian Neil Verma joins Kojo to explore what really happened, as well as the craft behind the radio play itself

NPR

Belafonte And MLK Family Take Memorabilia Dispute To Court

Musician and social activist Harry Belafonte is suing the family of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., over documents he claims were given to him by the civil rights leader. Host Michel Martin talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning MLK biographer David Garrow about the case.
NPR

Henry Louis Gates Jr. On Untangling African-American History

The history of African-Americans is a long and complicated one. Scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. is trying to tell that story in a new PBS documentary, The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. He speaks to host Michel Martin about tracing the African-American experience from the second inauguration of President Obama to the first African explorer.
NPR

The Racial History Of The 'Grandfather Clause'

Companies and individuals are considered grandfathered and exempt from new sets of regulations all the time. But the term and the concept date from the era of segregation that followed the Civil War.
NPR

Violin Said To Have Been On The Titanic Sells For $1.6M

Bandleader Wallace Hartley is thought to have kept playing the instrument as the ship went down. It was later found, in a leather case, floating among the wreckage.
NPR

'12 Years' Is The Story Of A Slave Whose End Is A Mystery

Solomon Northup, an African-American musician from New York, was kidnapped and sold into slavery in 1841. He was eventually freed and wrote about his experience in Twelve Years a Slave, a memoir that has inspired a new film adaptation. But by the end of the Civil War, he dropped off the public record.
NPR

Will The Rest Of The World Catch Up To The West?

Historian Niall Ferguson explains why, when it comes to amassing wealth, it's been the West versus the rest for the past 500 years. He suggests six killer apps that promote wealth, stability and innovation — and are now shareable.
WAMU 88.5

Arena Stage Premieres 'Maurice Hines Is Tappin' Thru Life'

Broadway legend Maurice Hines is teaming up with the D.C.-born-and-bred Manzari Brothers to tap audiences through his incredible 40 years in show business.

NPR

Pucker Up, America: Beers Are Going Sour

A brew that has all the complexity of a wine and the zing of a Sour Patch Kid, these tangy beers are rising in popularity. And with few hops in them, they're a great option to try if you don't like bitter beers or prefer a pinot noir to a Pilsner.

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