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Should Anything Be Done With The Confederate Monument In Rockville?

Local governments around the country are turning renewed scrutiny onto symbols of the Confederacy, including a monument to "the thin gray line" in Rockville, Maryland.

NPR

Known As A Collector, Gustave Caillebotte Gets His Due As A Painter

Caillebotte was an independently wealthy artist who — unlike his Impressionist buddies — didn't need to sell paintings to make a living. Now, many of his works are on display at the National Gallery.
NPR

Remembering New Orleans' Overlooked Ties To Slavery

The city has a reputation for music, food and fun. But it's also a land with an economic history rooted in the domestic slave trade that tore families apart. Now, its legacy sits below the surface.
NPR

Where There's A Wheel, There's A Way. Where There Are 2, Things Can Get Weird

Boneshakers, gunshots and "hygienic saddles": Cycling's history is littered with oddities. With the Tour de France in full swing, journalist A.J. Jacobs offers some choice nuggets of bike trivia.
NPR

Hillary Clinton Returns To A Very Different Arkansas

The former Arkansas first lady returns Saturday night to the place she called home for more than two decades — but has virtually no chance of winning in 2016.
NPR

What Hats Tell Us About American Men

A brief and incomplete study of men's hats in American history — and what they reveal.
NPR

Seven Decades Ago, A New, Enormous Kind Of Explosion

Seventy years ago this week, in the New Mexico desert, U.S. Army scientists detonated the first atom bomb. NYU physics professor Benjamin Bederson was among those who worked on the Manhattan Project.
NPR

Tennessee Community Pushes To Reopen 'Civil Rights Hero' Cold Case

Beyond preserving his legacy, city leaders are calling to investigate the 1940 death of Elbert Williams, who is believed to be the first NAACP official killed for seeking voting rights for blacks.
NPR

We Didn't Build This City On Rock 'N' Roll. It Was Yogurt

We got milk when we domesticated goats and sheep around 9,000 BC. At first, that milk was easier to digest when fermented. So yogurt, along with other Neolithic foods, helped fuel civilization.
WAMU 88.5

"The Orphan Sky"

Singer, composer, and- most recently- author Ella Leya was born in Communist Azerbaijan and received asylum in the United States in 1990. Leila, the main character of her new novel "The Orphan Sky" shares a similar story. We talk with the first-time novelist about the rarely-explored setting of Azerbaijan and how music influenced her life and writing.

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