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How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics

In the Soviet Union's communal kitchens, many families jockeyed for one stove. Apartments were crowded, food was scarce and government informants were everywhere. Still, some found joy and connection.
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The Winding Stories Of A Quintessential American Spy

Among his colleagues at the CIA, Robert Ames was considered the quintessential spy. Integral in the Oslo Peace Accords, the late secret agent is now the subject of Kai Bird's book, The Good Spy.
NPR

Interpreter Viktor Sukhodrev, Fulcrum Of The Cold War, Dies At 81

Robert Siegel speaks with Cold War-era Moscow correspondent Marvin Kalb about Sukhodrev's life and work. The legendary interpreter died last week at age 81.Over three decades, Viktor Sukhodrev was the interpreter for every Soviet leader from Nikita Khrushchev to Mikhail Gorbachev.
NPR

What We Learned From The Best Commencement Speeches Ever

Our new searchable database of commencement speeches brings you more than 300 of the best, tagged with the most enduring themes: Work hard. Change the world. And, of course, YOLO.
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If You Want To Teach Kids History, Try Grossing Them Out First

Grown-ups might not "get it," but subjects like bugs and poop can make history lessons a little more palatable for middle schoolers. Author Sarah Albee says she writes books for her inner 12-year-old.
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The American Story, As It Was Reported To The Rest Of The Nation

A new exhibit about ethnic newspapers, radio and TV stations and other media outlets has opened at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.
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A First Black Professor Remembers Her Segregated Education

In 1966, Hortense McClinton became the first black professor hired by the University of North Carolina. She says in some ways, things are better since Brown v. Board — but in some ways, they aren't.
NPR

How It Happened: 10 Years Of Gay Marriage

On May 17 10 years ago, Massachusetts issued the first fully legal same-sex marriage license in the United States. Tanya McCloskey and Marcia Kadish were the recipients of that license. The growing acceptance of gay marriage in the U.S. is due in part to gay advertising and public support of gay-friendly workplace policies. Marketing expert David Paisley explains how that change happened to guest host Tess Vigeland.
NPR

Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

No one wants to return to the system of American apartheid. Public education, with its glaring inequities, is a reminder of all the work left undone.
NPR

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

The Nigerian Nobel laureate says the abduction of more than 250 girls by extremist group Boko Haram is a defining moment for his country.

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