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As Gay Marriage Heads To Court, A Look Back At The Bumpy Ride

The Supreme Court hears two gay marriage cases next week. These will be the next major steps on a path the country has traveled for decades. Those who have been affected by the gay marriage battle reflect on the changes so far.
WAMU 88.5

David Stockman: "The Great Deformation"

President Ronald Reagan’s former budget director on today’s economy. David Stockman on what he calls the corruption of capitalism in America.

NPR

Perle Looks Back On The Start Of The Iraq War

As part of Morning Edition's coverage of the 10th anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, Renee Montagne talks to Richard Perle, former chairman of the Defense Department's Defense Policy Board. Perle was one of the most outspoken champions of invading Iraq, He explains his early support for the war and elaborates on the miscalculations of the last decade.
NPR

After 50 Years, A State Of Crisis For The Right To Counsel

On Mar. 18, 1963, the U.S. Supreme Court rules that state courts are required to provide counsel in criminal cases to those unable to afford it. Just before the 50th anniversary of the decision, Attorney General Eric Holder said that the nation's public defense systems "exist in a state of crisis."
WAMU 88.5

Passover Traditions, New And Old

The Jewish festival of Passover begins at sundown Monday with a feast that's both universal and unique to families and communities around the world. Food Wednesday explores the merger of tradition and innovation at the seder table.

NPR

Norman Francis On 45 Years At Xavier's Helm

Xavier University of Louisiana has a number of distinctions. It is the country's only historically black, Catholic University. Plus, it's one of the leading universities when it comes to sending African-American students on to medical school. And at 45 years, no other university's president has served longer than Xavier's Norman Francis.
NPR

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Gustave Whitehead, a German immigrant who lived in Bridgeport, Conn., was the first to fly a plane, according to one expert who examined a photo recently unearthed in a Bavarian museum. This claim has reignited a debate among researchers, and a fight with the Smithsonian.
NPR

'FDR And The Jews' Puts A President's Compromises In Context

President Franklin D. Roosevelt said little and did less on behalf of Jews trying to get out of Nazi Germany; but he also won Jewish votes by landslide margins and led the Allies to victory in World War II. A new history by Richard Breitman and Allan Lichtman revises FDR's performance upward.

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