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NPR

'68 Olympian: If You're Famous And You're Black, You Have To Be An Activist

John Carlos won the bronze for the 200 meter run in the 1968 Olympics. He's remembered for a political gesture he made. Renee Montagne talks to him about whether athletes can influence public opinion.
NPR

A Mew-seum? Civil War Stories, Told With Tiny Tails

The stars of the exhibits at Civil War Tails are the nearly 2,000 tiny clay soldiers. Their blue and gray uniforms are meticulously detailed, down to piping and patches. Look closely: They are cats.
NPR

Hot Enough For You? Cool Off With A Brief History Of Frozen Treats

The Roman Emperor Nero was said to enjoy snow topped with honey. Persians liked to drink sharbate over ice. But a scientific discovery in the 1500s paved the way for our modern ice creams.
WAMU 88.5

As Chief Lanier Prepares To Exit, Trinidad Checkpoints Remain Flashpoint In Tenure

The decision to set up military-style checkpoints around one D.C. neighborhood in 2008 represents what supporters and critics say was the best and worst of Cathy Lanier's time as police chief.

NPR

Distilling The Story Of California Wine, One Label At A Time

At the world's largest wine research library — inside UC Davis — librarians are crowd-sourcing their archives to understand the forces that shaped California's wine industry into a global powerhouse.
WAMU 88.5

Debate Over Armchair Psychological Assessments Of Donald Trump

Many psychiatrists have offered armchair assessments of Donald Trump’s mental health. We discuss the history of diagnosing mental fitness for high office, when personality disorders can be strengths and the pitfalls of long distance psychological analysis.

WAMU 88.5

LISTEN: Jim Graham Talks About Christopher Barry Battling His Demons

Christopher Barry, son of late D.C. Mayor Marion Barry, died over the weekend. We spoke to former D.C. Council member Jim Graham about working with both father and son and his perspective on the young Barry's demons.

NPR

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of A Square Meal, discuss food trends of the time.
WAMU 88.5

Where The National Museum of African American History And Culture Meets Local D.C.

This fall, the doors of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will open to the public more than a century after the idea of such an institution was first discussed.

NPR

The Gold-Hungry Forty-Niners Also Plundered Something Else: Eggs

When food shortages struck San Francisco, wily entrepreneurs raided the dangerous Farallon Islands for protein-rich eggs from seabirds. In the process, they destroyed both wildlife and each other.

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