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NPR

Addiction Battled Ambition For Reporter Caught In D.C.'s Crack Epidemic

In the early '90s, Ruben Castaneda was a crime reporter for The Washington Post, and an addict who bought crack on the very streets he wrote about. His new book is called S Street Rising.
NPR

Digital Homestead Records Reopen A Crucial Chapter Of U.S. History

Files detailing Nebraska's homesteading history have been digitized and are now available to the public. The milestone's part of a larger effort by the Homestead Digitization Project to put all homesteading documents from around the U.S. online. For more on the subject, Robert Siegel speaks with historian Blake Bell from the Homestead National Monument in Beatrice, Neb.
NPR

At 50, The Civil Rights Act Creates 'Opportunities For All Americans'

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Michel Martin speaks with historians Charles Cobb and Taylor Branch about the legacy of the Act and what it accomplished.
NPR

Mourning In The Closet: She Was More Than My Best Friend

StoryCorps, the team that brings you conversations between loved ones, is now highlighting voices of the LGBTQ community. OutLoud brings a story about losing a partner while living in the closet.
NPR

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Carol Zachary was 9 when her grandfather gave her an invitation to a hanging he attended in 1917. She peppered him with questions, but the meaning of his gesture still remains a mystery, even today.
NPR

Colombia Advances In World Cup, Two Decades After Infamous Murder

In 1994, star player Andres Escobar was killed just weeks after he scored an own goal in the Cup. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Colombian-American journalist and novelist John Rojas about the crime.
NPR

Should Saying Someone Is 'Off The Reservation' Be Off-Limits?

The term dates back to the 19th century when white traders would swap "firewater" for Indian goods and "off the reservation" was "a lonely and dangerous place for an aboriginal American to be."
NPR

As Yosemite Park Turns 150, Charms And Challenges Endure

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln set aside the nation's first federally-protected wilderness areas. Visitors have enjoyed Yosemite's wonders ever since — sometimes to the point of endangering them.
NPR

Sarajevo Celebrates WWI Centennial With Joy And The Macabre

Saturday marks 100 years since the Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo. NPR's Scott Simon talks with correspondent Ari Shapiro about how Sarajevans are commemorating the event.
NPR

Princip Pulled 'The Trigger,' But Never Meant To Start A War

Journalist Tim Butcher's new book traces the footsteps of Gavrilo Princip, the young Serbian revolutionary who famously sparked World War I by assassinating Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria.

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