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MRIs More Likely To Be Negative When The Doctor Profits

Maybe you didn't need that MRI, but your doctor did. Scans are more likely to find no problems if doctors make money from the MRI, a study concludes. Congress and the states have tried to crack down on doctors self-referring to scanners they own, but the practice continues to drive up health care costs.
NPR

End Of An Era: Lipitor Goes Generic

Two new generic brands of cholesterol-lowering medication threaten sales to Pfizer's number one selling drug — Lipitor. Good news? More people can afford it now.
NPR

HIV-Positive Gay Latino Spreads Safe Sex Education

The global HIV infection rate dropped about 21 percent from 1997 to 2010, says the U.N. But only 28 percent of carriers in the U.S. are getting effective treatment, according to the CDC. Host Michel Martin speaks with Jose Ramirez, a gay Latino who lives with HIV and works with a non-profit health center. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)
NPR

Tainted Nectar? Consumer Group Warns Of Arsenic In Fruit Juice

Dangerous levels of arsenic and lead have been detected in juices found in many supermarkets. Consumers Union is calling for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to set a new standard to protect kids.
WAMU 88.5

Inova Screening 'The Other City' For World AIDS Day

In honor of World AIDS Day, a local hospital is screening The Other City, a documentary filmed in the D.C. region about people struggling with AIDS/HIV.

NPR

Medicare To Cover Weight Loss Counseling

Medicare has announced that it will pay for primary care providers to counsel obese patients on losing weight and maintaining the weight loss. Medicare will pay doctors, nurses and physicians' assistants to help plan weight loss programs.
NPR

Many Women Underestimate Fertility Clock's Clang

A new survey finds that while women understand that fertility declines with age, they dramatically underestimate by how much. Infertility experts say the increasing number of older women having babies — often through extensive fertility treatments — can provide a false sense of comfort.

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