Health

RSS Feed
NPR

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

You've probably heard that forgiveness reduces stress and can provide peace and closure. But Slate advice columnist Emily Yoffe says that's not always true. She tells host Michel Martin that sometimes it's better to cut ties, especially in the case of some abusive parents. Psychiatrist Richard Friedman also joins the conversation.
NPR

Dr. Ben Carson: Healthcare Is 'Upside Down'

Dr. Ben Carson is known for blazing trails in the neurological field - including breakthrough work separating conjoined twins. Now he's making waves for his political views. Host Michel Martin talks with Dr. Carson about the current state of healthcare in America and his upcoming speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.
NPR

Medical Trials Need More Diversity

According to the National Cancer Institute, African-Americans account for less than 10 percent of its clinical trial participants. That's despite being more likely than any other racial group to die of cancer. Host Michel Martin talks with Junius Hayes. He volunteered to be the first American participant to test a prostate cancer device.
NPR

Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

Living like a hunter-gatherer won't guarantee you'll be free of heart disease, according to a study of ancient human remains. Scans of mummies from preindustrial Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and Alaska's Aleutian Islands finds evidence of hardened arteries thousands of yeas ago.
WAMU 88.5

Women Walk On National Mall In Honor Of Harriet Tubman

A century after the passing of abolitionist icon Harriet Tubman, a group of women took to the National Mall to walk in support of what they believe is the issue of our time — the health crisis in the African American community.

NPR

New Voices For The Voiceless: Synthetic Speech Gets An Upgrade

For those who rely on technology to speak, there are a limited number of voices. "Perfect Paul" sounds robotic, and "Heather" can seem too old for some. Now, a researcher is using sound samples from people who have never been able to speak to create new, personalized voices for them.
NPR

Aspirin Vs. Melanoma: Study Suggests Headache Pill Prevents Deadly Skin Cancer

Women who took aspirin at least a couple of times a week for five years or more cut their risk of melanoma by 30 percent. The new study adds to the mounting pile of research suggesting that cheap, common aspirin lowers the risk of many cancers, including colon, breast, esophagus, stomach, prostate, bladder and ovarian cancer.

Pages