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Komen Hopes Walkers Won't Walk Out On Event

Since the Susan G. Komen 3-Day walks began nine years ago, participants have raised more than $600 million nationwide for breast cancer research. Now, in the wake of a controversy over Komen's grants to Planned Parenthood, some participants are worried it might be harder to get donations this year.
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Carbon Monoxide Leak Strikes Southeast D.C.

At least a dozen residents of Southeast D.C. are being monitored after a carbon monoxide leak stemming from a basement furnace put them at risk. 

NPR

How Much Should Kids Sleep? Nobody Knows For Sure

Everybody says children don't get enough sleep, and they've been saying that since at least 1905. Scientists still aren't sure how much time children need, according to a new study. But the experts always say they need more.
NPR

Cosmetic Surgery Rebounds, A Little, After Dip

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons say demand for cosmetic surgery is rising as at the economy improves. For the second year in a row surgical procedures increased by 2 percent. Nonsurgical procedures, such as Botox injections.
NPR

Is Obesity The Government's Business?

In the U.S., more than 78 million adults and 12 million children are obese, prompting some to argue that it's in the government's interest to combat the problem. But others say the government should stay away from people's personal habits. A group of experts takes on the topic in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S.
NPR

Consumers Have Little Guidance On Energy Drinks

Ever since Red Bull came on to the market in 1997, there's been an explosion in caffeinated energy drinks. Some are marketed as food and others as dietary supplements. But there's little guidance for the consumer on how much caffeine is in them. And beyond the word energy on the label, it's hard to tell exactly what an energy drink is.
NPR

Contraception: Catholics Split On Insurance Debate

The Obama administration has revised a provision of the president's health care law concerning birth control coverage. Now, religious-affiliated organizations may decline to provide the coverage, but allow the employees to get free contraceptives through their health insurer.

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