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NPR

Is Health Law A 'Breathtaking Assertion' Of Power?

Next week, the Supreme Court will hear challenges to the Affordable Care Act. In the first of a series of conversations about the case, host Michel Martin sits down with Michael Cannon of the Cato Institute. Cannon opposes the law and his group has filed four briefs with the high court, arguing that key parts of the measure are unconstitutional.
NPR

Writing The Messy Life Of A Sexual Health Pioneer

Margaret Sanger founded the organization that became Planned Parenthood. Her work around sexual health made her one of the most celebrated and vilified figures in women's history. Host Michel Martin explores Sanger's complex life and drive for her work with Jean Baker, author of the biography Margaret Sanger: A Life of Passion.
NPR

The Man Behind The Defense Of Obama's Health Law

Over more than 25 years as an attorney, Solicitor General Don Verrilli has developed a reputation as both a gentleman and a scholar, two attributes that have helped him earn the trust of the Supreme Court's justices. Next week, he'll go before those same justices to argue in favor of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Medicare Board Draws Fire Before It Even Meets

The House is expected to pass a bill that would eliminate a board that is charged with reining in Medicare spending. But Democrats generally oppose the change, and President Obama has promised to veto the legislation if it ever gets that far.
NPR

Army Health Care In Spotlight After Afghan Shooting

As officials prepare charges against Staff Sgt. Robert Bales for his alleged killing spree in Afghanistan, concerns are growing about mental health screening for soldiers. The Army says it wants to help those with PTSD and other conditions, but the screening process has been described as an "assembly line," and soldiers who want psychological help have good reasons not to seek it out.
NPR

Obama's Health Care Law In Court: An Overview

The Supreme Court is getting ready to hear its biggest case in decades — or at least its longest. Next week, three days and six hours of hearings may determine whether President Obama's landmark health care law lives or dies.

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