Health

RSS Feed
NPR

Meningitis From Tainted Drugs Puts Patients, Doctors In Quandary

Public health officials are trying to strike a balance between alerting, diagnosing and treating patients who might be at risk of fungal infections — and not overdiagnosing and overtreating those who aren't at risk. The caution is warranted. This type of infection can smolder for weeks before exploding into meningitis or causing massive strokes.
NPR

Kids As Caregivers Face Special Challenges

When we think of family caregivers, we often think of adults caring for aging parents. But more than 1.3 million young people in the U.S. between the ages of 8 and 18 care for sick or disabled family members. Caregiving is emotionally taxing for people of any age, but can be especially so for teens.
NPR

Often, For-Profit Firms, Not FDA, Inspects Food

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, foodborne illnesses kill some 3,000 people in the U.S. each year. Often, the job of keeping America's food supply safe falls to for-profit companies with connections to the food producers they're supposed to inspect.
WAMU 88.5

Doctor Shortage Looms, Even As Med School Applications Go Up

Hard limits on the number of residencies will eventually create a bottleneck in the medical professional as record numbers of students apply to medical school.

NPR

Insurers Revive Child-Only Policies, But Cost Is Still An Issue

Since the health law was enacted, 22 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws or regulations that encouraged insurers to begin selling child-only policies again, a study found. But in many states there are no restrictions on how much insurers can charge for them.
NPR

Monster Beverage Under Fire As Reports Link Deaths To Its Energy Drinks

Newly released death reports and a lawsuit against Monster Energy raise more questions and public scrutiny on the risks of drinking the high levels of caffeine found in supersized energy drinks, especially in teens.
NPR

Restraint And Seclusion: Discipline Gone Too Far?

At some schools, unruly children are physically restrained or isolated in so-called seclusion rooms. Critics like investigative journalist Bill Lichtenstein say the methods are often abusive and must stop. He wrote about his own daughter's experience in an opinion piece for The New York Times. He talks with host Michel Martin.

Pages