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Dallas Deploys Old Weapon In New Mosquito Fight

The city has approved its first aerial spraying in 45 years to combat an outbreak of West Nile virus. Over the years, the chemicals used for aerial spraying have become much safer for everything and everyone involved — save the mosquitoes.
WAMU 88.5

Study: Many Virginians Lack Access To Dental Care

Many people in Virginia don't have access to dental care because of costs and lack of dentists, according to a study by two economists at the University of Virginia.

NPR

PTSD Isn't Just A War Wound; Teens Suffer, Too

About 4 percent of teenage boys and 6 percent of teenage girls have PTSD. Many of them have physical symptoms related to their stress, including problems sleeping, weight gain and hair loss. Researchers are trying to identify which parts of the brain are affected by PTSD so they can come up with more ways to treat the disorder.
NPR

Solar Toilet Disinfects Waste, Makes Hydrogen Fuel

The Reinvent the Toilet Challenge asked engineers to dream up a replacement for the antiquated flush toilet. Michael Hoffmann and his team at Caltech responded with a solar-powered toilet that disinfects waste and reuses wastewater to flush. Better yet, it pumps out hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells.
NPR

WHO Calls For Emergency Stockpile Of Cholera Vaccine

After a successful project to vaccinate Haitians against cholera, the World Health Organization is calling for the establishment of a global stockpile of the vaccine to respond to outbreaks like the one that struck Haiti.
NPR

Aging City Pipes In Need Of A Plumber's Touch

A typical American family uses 400 gallons of water a day. But the pipes that ferry that water are bursting faster than they can be replaced. George Hawkins, general manager of DC Water, and environmental historian Martin Melosi discuss past and present issues with pumping water into cities.
NPR

Some Docs Doubt Blood Type, Heart Disease Link

A new study claims people with blood type A, B or AB may have a slightly higher risk of heart disease, compared to those with the most common blood group, type O. But some doctors, like cardiologist Eric Topol, question the study's conclusion, and say patients shouldn't fret about their blood type.

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