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NPR

U.S. Health Care Workforce Larger Than Ever

One in eight Americans work in health care and the U.S. spends about $2.7 trillion on it each year. Tony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, tells Robert Siegel that the U.S. healthcare system is "growing like crazy."
NPR

One Nation, Two Health Care Extremes

When it comes to health care in the U.S., no two states are more different than Texas and Massachusetts, which boast the highest and lowest rates of uninsured people, respectively. Those differences come into stark relief in the lives of Texan Melinda Maarouf and Massachusetts resident Peter Brook.
NPR

Kids Exposed To Meth In Womb Can Struggle With Behavior Problems

Meth-exposed children are more anxious and depressed at age 3, a new study found. And they tended to be more disruptive at age 5. But researchers say those problems are manageable if children and parents get help early on.
NPR

Blurring The Line Between Life And Death

Science writer Dick Teresi and transplant surgeon Richard Freeman discuss the ethics of transplant surgery and how doctors determine the point between life and death.
NPR

Raising Voices Against HIV On The Reservation

The Gallup Indian Medical Center in New Mexico has seen a rise in the number of new HIV cases among Navajo in the last decade. Some Navajo say that talking about HIV means wishing it upon the people. Host Michel Martin speaks with The Navajo AIDS Network's Melvin Harrison and Dr. Jonathan Iralu, who works at the Medical Center.
NPR

Florida Challenges Medicaid Spending 'By Force'

When the Supreme Court hears arguments over President Obama's health care law this week, one item on the table will be a program that has been in place for nearly 50 years: Medicaid. The program is already a sore issue in Florida, which is one of the states fighting the health care law.
NPR

Prone To Failure, Some All-Metal Hip Implants Need To Be Removed Early

Shavings of metal can flake off of the artificial joints and cause serious pain and medical problems in the hip. About a half-million Americans have this type of implant, and though most patients won't have a problem, one doctor called the failure rate "unacceptably high."

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