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The Myth Of Multitasking

How long can you go without checking email, or glancing at your smartphone? Clifford Nass, a psychology professor at Stanford University, says today's nonstop multitasking actually wastes more time than it saves--and he says there's evidence it may be killing our concentration and creativity too.
NPR

Microexpressions: More Than Meets The Eye

David Matsumoto, a psychology professor at San Francisco State University, trains national security officials and police officers to recognize "microexpressions"--fleeting, split-second flashes of emotion across someone's face. Matsumoto says those subtle cues may reveal how an interview subject is feeling, helping officials to hone their line of questioning.
NPR

It Came From Norway To Take On A Medical Goliath

A company that got its start assessing the risks of ocean-going vessels now checks U.S. hospitals for quality. Known as DNV, the firm is bringing competition to an area of health care that obsesses insiders yet is little known by patients.
NPR

How Can Identical Twins Turn Out So Different?

Scientists used to think that identical twins turned out differently because they were treated differently by friends, teachers or their parents. A study of mice supports the idea that small changes in behavior can lead to larger ones and eventually even resculpt brains in different ways.
NPR

No Longer Experimental, Egg Freezing May Appeal To More Women

By age 38, Sarah Elizabeth Richards had spent $50,000 to freeze 70 of her own eggs. Richards, author of Motherhood Rescheduled, wrote in the Wall Street Journal that egg freezing put an end to the sadness she was feeling "at losing my chance" to have a child.
NPR

Using Bacteria To Swat Malaria Inside Mosquitoes

Infecting mosquitoes with a specific type of bacteria makes the insects resistant to malaria. Now scientists have figured out how to get the mosquitoes to pass the infections on to their offspring. If it can done reliably, it might help interrupt transmission of malaria to humans.

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