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NPR

For Youths, Fewer Homicides But Still Many Deaths

Homicide rates have dropped among youths, mirroring a decline in crime overall. But almost 5,000 young people were killed in 2010, and researchers say there's no clear evidence on what works best to prevent those deaths.
NPR

After FDA Approval, Drugmakers Often Miss Study Mark

Since 2007, the Food and Drug Administration has had the power to require drugmakers to continue studying the safety of their pills or other medicines as a condition for approving them in the first place. An analysis finds that many studies are behind schedule.
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Friday News Roundup - Domestic

House Republicans overwhelmingly resist comprehensive immigration overhaul. President Barack Obama's nominee to head the FBI answers questions about domestic surveillance. And the Boston Marathon bombing suspect pleads not guilty. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week's top domestic news stories.

NPR

GOP Says, Why Not Delay That Health Care Law, Like, Forever?

The Obama administration's decision to delay an employer insurance requirement in the Affordable Care Act seems like a good idea to Republicans. So good, in fact, that GOP senators and congressmen are saying that the entire health care overhaul should be reconsidered.
NPR

Rich With Water But Little To Drink In Tajikistan

Many families in rural Tajikistan spend hours each day collecting water from communal spigots or nearby rivers, where the water often isn't safe. When one village gets a new water system — and a tap in each yard — residents have more time to grow food and earn money to support their families.
NPR

Bros Get Wasted; Girls Get Tipsy: Why Boozy Talk Matters

The words people use to describe their drinking behavior can say a lot about how they perceive drinking, a perception that may not match reality, researchers say. And the language may also reveal risks that may not be obvious to the drinkers themselves.
NPR

Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies

The former dental surgeon went to prison for a long-running scheme to obtain human bodies and then harvest their tissue for sale. He admitted guilt in 2008 and was sentenced to up to 58 years in prison. He died Sunday of cancer.
NPR

When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat As One

When members of a choir sing, their heart rates quickly become synchronized, beating in the same rhythm. Researchers think this may be why singing together is a key part of religious rituals around the world, and such a joy for the singers.
NPR

Do Diet Drinks Mess Up Metabolisms?

A body of evidence suggests artificial sweeteners — most often consumed in diet drinks — could raise the risk of weight gain and type 2 diabetes. Some researchers think that artificial sugar may confuse the body.
NPR

Catholics Split Again On Coverage For Birth Control

Three years ago, the Catholic Health Association, whose members run hospitals and nursing homes across the country, backed passage of the federal health law. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which represents the hierarchy of the church, opposed it. The groups remain divided over the law's requirement for most employer-based health insurance plans to provide women with contraceptives.

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