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Protesters, Spectators Gather Outside Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court begin hearing oral arguments on the health care law Monday. Outside the court, protesters and counter-protesters gathered with signs and chants. Also, people hoping to get in to witness the proceedings started lining up Friday morning.
NPR

Supreme Court Watchers Vie For Front Row Seats

The Supreme Court begins hearing arguments Monday on President Obama's health care law. There will be six hours of arguments spread over three days. With only 400 seats in the courtroom and political interest roiling, people began lining up early for a front-row seat.
NPR

Employers Monitor Health Care Law Arguments

The Supreme Court won't rule on President Obama's health care case until June. Republicans vow to repeal the law if they win big in November. David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal, talks to David Greene about how the ruling could affect doctors, hospitals, employers and consumers.
NPR

Hospitals Warn Smartphones Could Distract Doctors

Apple's iPads and rival devices are finding a happy home in hospitals and medical practices. But as with driving, distractions are threatening safety — in this case, patient safety.
NPR

4 Questions That Could Make Or Break The Health Care Law

The Supreme Court on Monday begins the first of three days of historic oral arguments on President Obama's health care law. The court has boiled the arguments down to four key constitutional questions. First up: Does the court even have the jurisdiction to hear this case right now?
NPR

Facebook May Not Be So Friendly For Those With Low Self-Esteem

They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances. Researchers wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online.
NPR

Bird Flu Studies Getting Another Round Of Scrutiny By Panel

An expert committee that advises the government is once again going to review some controversial studies on bird flu to see if they can be published openly. Last year, those experts said no, because of concerns that the work could be misused and was too dangerous, but the government asked it to reconsider after a World Health Organization panel came to the opposite conclusion.

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