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NPR

Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

When an especially nasty intestinal bug threatened 86-year-old Billie Iverson, an unusual transplant saved her. The medical solution, still experimental, was to replace her dangerous digestive bacteria with a healthier mix of microbes.
NPR

Scrutiny Of 'Molly' Party Drug Increases After 4 Deaths

A recent string of deaths in the Northeast from a drug known as Molly has authorities looking into whether a bad batch is to blame. Molly, a purified form of the drug known as Ecstasy, can be as easy to get — and as cheap — as a six-pack of beer.
NPR

Why Younger Women Could Benefit From Mammograms After All

Women who died of breast cancer were less likely to have had a mammogram in the past two years, researchers found. That was particularly true among younger women. Even though breast cancer is rarer in the young, the tumors can be more aggressive.
WAMU 88.5

Think Before You Ink: DC's Proposed 24-Hour Tattoo Wait Period

Last week, the D.C. Department of Health proposed new regulations that would require a 24-hour waiting period for tattoos. We explore the myriad proposed changes to tattoo and piercing regulations.

WAMU 88.5

Hunger In The U.S.

Food insecurity remains at near-record levels for the fifth straight year, with one in five American children at risk of hunger.

NPR

Humanitarian Aid Agencies Brace For Fallout From Syrian Strikes

Millions of Syrians have poured into refugee camps, where food, water and health services are scarce. As the U.S. prepares for possible military action, aid agencies are preparing for thousands more people to flee and worsen the humanitarian crisis.
NPR

From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

Trillions of microbes live on and in the human body, tucked into very different ecosystems. Some like the dark, warm confines of the mouth. Others prefer the desert-dry skin of the forearm. The biggest and most active collection of microbes hang out in the gut.
NPR

Treatment For Middle East Coronavirus Works In Monkey Tests

Scientists offer a glimmer of hope that a treatment for humans with the deadly disease might be on the horizon. Two drugs commonly used to treat other viral infections reduced the symptoms of the Middle East respiratory syndrome in a small number of monkeys.
NPR

'Memory Pinball' And Other Reasons You Need A Nap

Researchers have found that sleep helps you learn and that when you don't have it, you get cranky. But fundamental questions about this complex function go unanswered. For starters, why do we sleep to begin with?
NPR

E-Cigarettes May Match The Patch In Helping Smokers Quit

An experiment to test the value of e-cigarettes as a quitting aid found them as good as the nicotine patch, but there weren't enough people in the study to say they're a good bet for quitting. Public health officials worry that e-cigarettes will encourage tobacco use.

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