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NPR

Humans, The World's 'Superomnivores'

In his book The Omnivorous Mind: Our Evolving Relationship with Food, neuroanthropologist John S. Allen discusses the history of human eating, from foraged foods on the savannah to four-star meals cooked by celebrity chefs, and discusses why crunchy foods like tempura and fried chicken have universal appeal.
NPR

Breaking Out Of A Web Of Fear

Reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers write that a brief therapy session with people who had a lifelong phobia of spiders resulted in lasting changes to brain areas that process fear. A panel of experts discuss the results, debilitating fear and ways to overcome it.
NPR

Tick Talk: Lyme Disease Under The Microscope

Banking giant JPMorgan's multibillion-dollar trading loss is blamed on an executive's absence due to Lyme disease. And a mild winter has some scientists predicting a busy tick season ahead. A panel of experts discuss how the infection is contracted, why it's often misdiagnosed and the most effective treatment options.
WAMU 88.5

Analysis: Senate Agrees On FDA Bill, But Not On Student Loans

David Hawkings of CQ Roll Call Daily Briefing explains how it was possible that 96 senators voted for the same thing this week, and whether a similar agreement on a troubled student loan bill will be possible later this year. 

NPR

'Ripped Reverend' Finds Joy In Bodybuilding

Amy Richter was slathered up in oil and wearing a sparkling red bikini when she competed in her first bodybuilding contest a few years ago. That was quite a change for an Episcopal priest. Host Michel Martin speaks with the "Ripped Reverend" about keeping the body and spirit strong.
NPR

Does Race Affect Your Hospital Stay?

NPR's "Sick in America" survey found that a lot of Americans are unhappy with the healthcare system. Among those who had a recent serious healthcare experience, nearly half said that a lack of cultural understanding played a big role in the problems with U.S. healthcare quality. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR's Richard Knox and Dr. Kavita Patel of the Brookings Institution.
NPR

Need A Nurse? You May Have To Wait

A new poll finds 34 percent of patients hospitalized for at least one night in the past year said "nurses weren't available when needed or didn't respond quickly to requests for help." We asked nurses why that might be. Stories poured in about being overworked, comparing the job to "spinning plates."
NPR

Dispatchers' CPR Coaching Saves Lives When Every Minute Counts

Your chances of surviving a sudden heart attack may depend on where you live, in part because of the 911 dispatcher. If a dispatcher gives CPR instructions over the phone, the rate of survival goes up. There's now a push to make it universal, but some cities are slow to implement the necessary training.

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