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To Reduce Patient Falls, Hospitals Try Alarms, More Nurses

Patients fall in just a small fraction of hospital visits. But safety experts say bad falls should be called "never events" and shouldn't ever happen inside hospitals. There's a difference of opinion over the best way to reduce hazardous falls.
NPR

Family Caregiving Can Be Stressful, Rewarding And Life-Affirming

Taking care of an aging relative is often portrayed as a angst-laden misery. But the evidence on that is all over the map. A new study says that family caregivers actually live longer than their noncaregiving counterparts. Looking after someone with dementia can be stressful, but that's not always the case.
NPR

Why U.S. Taxpayers Pay $7 Billion A Year To Help Fast-Food Workers

Fifty-two percent of low-wage fast-food workers rely on public assistance programs like food stamps and Medicaid just to make ends meet, a fresh analysis finds. Many are adults supporting families. But some conservative economists say raising the minimum wage to $15 — as protesters are demanding — wouldn't help matters.
NPR

Hitches On Health Exchanges Hinder Launch Of Insurance Co-op

Maryland-based Evergreen Health Co-op is one of nearly two dozen nonprofit insurers created by the health act. They will be owned by the policyholders and are supposed to add competition and lower prices for coverage. But they can't do either without customers.

NPR

Arkansas Aims To Make Edamame As American As Apple Pie

Edamame beans are a popular Asian appetizer, and they're beginning to get a foothold in the U.S. market. An Arkansas company is now trying to cash in on this edamame boom.
NPR

Why A Medical Device Tax Became Part Of The Fiscal Fight

A sales tax on medical devices was passed to help pay for the Affordable Care Act. Manufacturers have been waging a persistent campaign to get rid of it. Now it's one of the bargaining chips being tossed around in the budget crisis on Capitol Hill.
NPR

Bioethicists Give Hollywood's Films A Reality Check

Bioethicists from Johns Hopkins talked shop with members of the film and television industry. Because a good story is an accurate story, the two groups discussed how to better portray moral medical issues on screen.
NPR

Medicare Begins Open Enrollment, With An Online Caveat

The government shutdown means some information on its website "may not be up to date," Medicare warns. Open enrollment for Medicare programs began Tuesday and will run into December.
NPR

Random Bedtimes Breed Bad Behavior In Kids

Random bedtimes have more influence on a child's behavior than going to bed late, a British study finds. That was true at home and at school. Researchers say that failing to hit the hay at the same time every day may mess up circadian rhythms and brain development. Fortunately, the ill effects are reversible.
NPR

Dodge Ball: Causing Harm Or Teaching Resilience?

A New York school has taken soccer balls, footballs — and maybe even the fun — out of recess. Officials say hard balls are a safety concern, but critics say they're being too cautious. Tell Me More's parenting roundtable weighs in.

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