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Cancer Rehab Begins To Bridge A Gap To Reach Patients

Cancer patients often have to deal with side effects from their treatments. They may need speech therapy or help rebuilding their strength. The STAR program is helping break down the barriers to rehabilitation services.
NPR

Al Roker On Being 'The Jolly Fat Person'

Al Roker won fame as the ever-smiling weatherman on NBC's Today show. But he also endured years of indignities because of his weight. That was until he had bariatric surgery, and lost more than 100 pounds. During this encore presentation, Roker talks with host Michel Martin about his experiences, and his latest book, Never Goin' Back.
NPR

What Nuclear Bombs Tell Us About Our Tendons

The fallout from Cold War bomb tests is shedding light on why the Achilles tendon heals so poorly after injuries. By looking at carbon-14, scientists have found that tendon tissue in people who were alive during the tests hasn't changed much since they were youngsters.
NPR

Author Katherine Bouton Opens Up About Going Deaf

After going deaf at the age of 30, writer Katherine Bouton's entire life changed. In her new book, "Shouting Won't Help," Bouton shares how she came to terms with hearing loss, and why more attention needs to be paid to a condition that affects nearly 50 million Americans.
WAMU 88.5

Pharmaceutical Companies Court Virginia Lawmakers For Rule Changes

Pharmaceutical companies have been singing Virginia's praises for it's pioneering work in clinical trials, but some wonder whether it's not a PR stunt to court favor for proposed rules changes on generic drugs.

NPR

Popular Workout Booster Draws Safety Scrutiny

Exercise buffs who take dietary supplements with the ingredient know as DMAA say the stimulant gives them a boost of energy. But some researchers and the Food and Drug Administration are worried that these products could be dangerous.
NPR

Should The U.S. Import More Doctors?

"We should think of doctors the same way we think of shirts," an economist says. "If we can get doctors at a lower cost from elsewhere in the world then we could save enormous amounts of money."
NPR

Don't Count On Extra Weight To Help You In Old Age

The notion that being a little overweight could help people in old age is being challenged. Some of the studies in support of the so-called obesity paradox excluded people who lived in institutions, like nursing homes, or were too sick to participate, a critic says.

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