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Mentally Ill Patients In New Mexico Scrambling To Find Help

This summer, New Mexico froze Medicaid payments to several mental health agencies due to "credible allegations of fraud." From there, the providers were taken over by Arizona companies, leaving approximately 30,000 patients to navigate New Mexico's complex mental health system alone.
NPR

On Eve Of U.N. Goal-Setting, AIDS Agency Claims Big Progress

A steady increase in the number of people getting antiviral drugs has helped lower the rates of infection and death from HIV. Treatment can save a person's life. It also helps reduce the risk that infected people will pass HIV to their sexual partners and children.
NPR

To Succeed At Breast-Feeding, Most New Moms Could Use Help

Almost all new mothers have trouble breast-feeding in the first week with their babies. The early problems, such as pain, were also the ones most likely to cause the women to give up on breast-feeding earlier than doctors recommend.
NPR

Smart Teenage Brains May Get Some Extra Learning Time

It used to be that neuroscientists thought smart people were all alike. But now they think that some very smart people retain the ability to learn rapidly, like a child, well into adolescence. That means they have a longer period of time to learn from their environment — and maybe learn Chinese.
NPR

How A Pregnant Woman's Choices Could Shape A Child's Health

Pregnant women are told not to drink, smoke or stress out. But it hasn't been clear how those choices may affect a fetus. By studying how genes are turned on and off, scientists say they are getting closer to understanding what experiences in the womb really affect a child's health.
NPR

In Life, Man Immune To HIV Helped Scientists Fight Virus

In the 1980s, Stephen Crohn was exposed to HIV but never became infected. Throughout his lifetime, he helped scientists discover a genetic mutation that keeps HIV from infecting the immune system. Crohn died in August at age 66. A doctor who worked with him reflects on his contributions to science and the fight against AIDS.
NPR

Black Widow Spider Fan Gets Dangerously Close To His Subject

The first time nature writer Jackson Landers spotted a black widow spider on his front porch, he was transfixed. He grew curious about the spiders and kept one for months as a pet. One day, he got bit.
NPR

How Many Die From Medical Mistakes In U.S. Hospitals?

The number of people who die each year because of medical errors in hospitals may be twice as high as previously estimated. An analysis suggests that 210,000 or more people may suffer some type of preventable harm that contributes to their death.
NPR

Study Finds Mixed Results For Back Braces To Treat Scoliosis

Children with scoliosis often are told to wear back braces. But the evidence that the braces prevents further curvature of the spine has been limited. A clinical trial finds that bracing helps, but it's hard to tell in advance who will benefit and who will be fine without wearing a brace.
NPR

Frustrated Adoptive Parents Turn To Online 'Exchanges'

An investigative report by Reuters reveals an online haven where frustrated adoptive parents can hand off children to strangers with virtually no oversight. Investigative reporter Megan Twohey speaks with host Michel Martin about the findings.

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